Education vs. unemployment

More Americans are jobless. The unemployment rate is 3.8 percent for college graduates, 6.2 percent for those with some college or a two-year degree, 8 percent for high school graduates and 12 percent for drop-outs.

The numbers show the importance of postsecondary education, writes Eduwonk.

Joblessness is rising for every group, counters Sherman Dorn. The link between education and employment hasn’t changed significantly.

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Comments

  1. I suspect that the jobless rate for college graduates varies tremendously by industry. Financial services has been hit extremely hard, and almost all of those cut have at least a bachelor’s and many a master’s or other graduate degree.

  2. The more education you have, the less likely you are to be fungible to your boss. This doesn’t mean you won’t get laid off, but it does mean that at least they will think about you while getting rid of you.

  3. Hopefully this economic depression will restore the value of a Bachelor’s degree by eliminating excessive liberal arts majors that lead to absolutely no career. This will take a while, though, as existing students graduate out of the system and universities reluctantly begin to give up majors that allow them to hand out degrees like party fliers.

  4. >Hopefully this economic depression will restore the value of a Bachelor’s degree by eliminating excessive liberal arts majors that lead to absolutely no career. <

    Somehow I don’t think that it’s people with English, History, or Philosophy degrees who are (allegedly) causing the value of a Bachelor’s degree to decline.

  5. PeterW-
    I was referencing more the Cultural Studies and Communications degrees. I have yet to meet anyone who has earned one of those degrees who isn’t a waste of oxygen.

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