College degrees that lead to a job

The most marketable college degrees of 2009 are nursing, computer/information science, engineering, economics and education, says MSN Encarta.

The least marketable degrees start with print journalism and include film studies, advertising, real estate and architecture.

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Comments

  1. Michael E. Lopez says:

    Who the #$&!@#*! gives a college degree in “real estate” ?

    I’ve never heard of such a thing.

    I suppose I should see if I can get my bachelor’s degree in Refrigerator Repair and Maintenance.

  2. Community colleges give associate’s degrees in real estate sales. You can also get an associate’s in refrigeration technology.

  3. Dangerous to pick careers based on what’s hot at the moment. If the same article had appeared 2-3 years ago, it probably would have shown real estate as one of the *most* marketable degrees.

  4. So it’s not plastics anymore.

  5. Why economics? Investment banks were big hirers of economists, and they’re downsizing.

    There probably will be a lot of demand for macroeconomics research as the result of the financial crisis (earthquake researchers celebrate whenever there’s a big quake as this means a few more years of grants). But that’s PhD level.

  6. Around thirty years ago while I was in college, I subscribed to the Columbia Journalism Review for a couple of years. I still remember an article questioning the value of a bachelors in journalism, with an unforgettable comment from Molly Ivins, “Journalism is fast replacing Home Economics as a major for people who aren’t smart and don’t know what they want to do.” Around the same time, I visited TCU for a football game and found a study sheet for Mass Communications 101 in the offices of the Daily Skiff. Mostly trivia about Adolph Ochs and which amendment addresses the press. Sigh.

    I was photo editor of the newspaper at a university without a journalism department. Maybe more Little Rascals than Adolph Ochs, but a valuable experience all the same.

    Of course, what I do now (search engines) was barely invented when I was in school. The computer science major was created while I was there.

  7. GoogleMaster says:

    Heh. Walter, based on your references to Molly Ivins, TCU, newspaper at a university without a journalism department, and computer science major being created while you were there, I guessed that you and I might have attended the same institute of higher learning at around the same time. Checking the alumni website, I confirmed it. I have the same degree, but 5 years later, specialty C-cubed.

  8. “Journalism is fast replacing Home Economics as a major for people who aren’t smart and don’t know what they want to do.”

    And yet these journalists, in our newspapers, magazines, and on TV, are the ones telling us all what is supposedly true and not true about what’s happening in the world we live in. Should we be worried about who we’re trusting to find, disseminate, and give us the information we need to make good decisions on who our politicans are, and what decisions they make that affects our lives?

  9. David Foster –
    “Dangerous to pick careers based on what’s hot at the moment. If the same article had appeared 2-3 years ago, it probably would have shown real estate as one of the *most* marketable degrees.”

    History shows that the best jobs are always in specific fields… and the necessity of these jobs don’t really change that much. Sciences, Engineering, Skilled Labor, Education, Medicine.