Rich and rejected in Manhattan

Not a single student at Dalton, an elite Manhattan private school, was accepted at Harvard this year. For $31,200 in tuition a year, parents are peeved, reports the New York Post. Marymount, a private girls school also struck out on Harvard admissions.

While high SAT scores and grade point averages, extracurricular activities and privileges such as a $46,000 private guidance counselor were once expected to guarantee admission to Ivy League schools, that’s not the case anymore. And for private schoolers who have grown up with their eyes on the Ivies, the idea of getting a good education at a less prestigious school is little comfort.

Kevin Carey cheers the news that the the children of the super-rich may have to settle for Johns Hopkins, Wesleyan and Vanderbilt instead of the holy trinity of Harvard, Yale and Princeton.

. . . it’s unambiguously a good thing that it’s apparently getting harder for rich Manhattanites to push their children into Harvard by spending vast sums of money on expensive private schools, $46,000 private Ivy League admissions consultants (that’s not a typo), etc. etc. The reason (anecdotal, to be sure): all the criticism of the Ivies’ plutocracy-sustaining admissions policies and near-total lack of economic diversity seems to be paying off, at least a little.

Applications are up: This year’s graduating class is huge, moderate-income students think they can afford the Ivies due to new aid policies and the Internet has made it easy to send off multiple applications. Not surprisingly, the percentage of applicants accepted at elite colleges is down to new lows.

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Comments

  1. forgive my only response to the super-rich who can’t buy their way into the Ivies being sarcastically mimed crying.

  2. Well, this article made me laugh. Does this make me an awful person?

    Let me play the world’s smallest violin…

  3. BadaBing says:

    It’s a bitch being rich.

  4. I hope the comments above come from a desire to have all students judged on their academic merits and *not* from class envy.

  5. Mark Roulo says:

    I hope the comments above come from a desire to have all students judged on their academic merits and *not* from class envy.

    I suspect that a lot of the feelings expressed in the comments are similar to watching the NY Yankees outspend everyone and still not win the world series. Even if they are a better team than the team that wins the world series, if the team that wins has only 1/2 the payroll, it can be hard to root for the Yankees.

    At $31,200 per year for four years, plus (for some) $46,000 for a “private guidance counselor” we are looking at about $200K over four years. I suspect that a bunch of these kids didn’t go to public schools for K-8, either, so we might be looking at something more like $400K-$500K over the K-12 years. This compares to some kids who go to public schools and can’t/won’t/don’t afford the $46K for the private guidance counselor.

    Then the $200K-$500K just wasn’t enough. So you have to use “personal connections” to get your kid into a top-20 college. Feels a lot like the parents are basically trying to purchase their child’s way into Harvard/Yale/Princeton. And failing (but still have to pay the bill, of course).

    From here it feels a lot like a David-Goliath issue, even though there is no visible David.

    Since I didn’t go to an Ivy and didn’t want to (no beach at any of the Ivies …), I find this 10+ year charge to get into one of a handful of colleges (for an undergraduate education, no less!) absolutely hysterical to watch. It gets even funnier when spending all that money doesn’t “work.”

    -Mark Roulo

  6. superdestroyer says:

    What those parents at Dalton know is that if there children attend Johns Hopkins or VAnderbilt, that some of the highest paying jobs in NYC are out of reach of the children. The entry level positions at McKinsey basically requries a degree from Harvard, Yale, or Princeton.

  7. “I hope the comments above come from a desire to have all students judged on their academic merits and *not* from class envy.”

    Yep, that’s it. We’re all “jus’ jellus.” *rolls eyes*

    No, I have to agree with the commenter above. It’s like these parents are trying to purchase their children’s way into these elite schools. I just happen to think it’s funny that it’s blown up in their faces.

  8. As someone who began homeschooling because our family could not afford the astronomical tuition charged by area private schools, I can’t help but gloat that there will be more former homeschoolers at Harvard next year than graduates of $31k/year Dalton. Sorry, I just can’t feel sorry for these overprivileged kids who expected an Ivy admission handed to them on a silver platter just because Daddy is a managing director at Goldman Sachs or the like…

Trackbacks

  1. […] 4. Joanne Jacobs: Rich and rejected in Manhattan Not a single student at Dalton, an elite Manhattan private school, was accepted at Harvard this year. For $31,200 in tuition a year, parents are peeved, reports the New York Post. Marymount, a private girls school also struck out on Harvard admissions. […]

  2. […] 4. Joanne Jacobs: Rich and rejected in Manhattan Not a single student at Dalton, an elite Manhattan private school, was accepted at Harvard this year. For $31,200 in tuition a year, parents are peeved, reports the New York Post. Marymount, a private girls school also struck out on Harvard admissions. […]