Boys won't be girls

Don’t teach boys to be like girls, says a British writer named Sue Palmer, a former teacher and literacy specialist, who thinks the feminized classroom is setting boys up for frustration and failure.

If you were an energetic nine-year-old boy who loved school, did your best but also loved charging about, trying to beat your friends at every game possible, imagine the hell of our currrent state school system where ball games are banned from the playground in case someone gets hurt, there is no outside play in bad weather and you are constantly in trouble for being too competitive because winning is not what it’s about.

In her forthcoming book, 21st Century Boys, Palmer calls for more opportunities for boys and girls to compete, take risks and “muck about.”

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Comments

  1. Barry Garelick says:

    Don’t tell Sara Mead.

  2. AMEN! As the mother of an almost-9-yr-old boy who is constantly in trouble for running ON THE PLAYGROUND (oh, the horrific sin of it all), and as a teacher of 4th graders, I wholeheartedly concur.

  3. Kelly A. Mezick says:

    I never thought about that concept, but it makes complete sense. While girls usually do not mind if sports are taken away or cancelled and tend to not be as competitive as boys, boys are. While there is a time and place for competition and sports, I have seen a gradual resistance of such behavior within the school day since I was in elementary, junior, and high school.

    In my personal educational career, I would say 85% of my teachers/instructors have been female, leading to a more “feminized” classroom. Is this better or worse? Am I a better or worse female teacher because of all of my female teachers? Are my students going to have a better or worse education because I am a female teacher? It’s definitely something to think about.

    Kelly A. Mezick
    Auburn University
    Auburn, Alabama

  4. BadaBing says:

    I hate feminized classrooms and strive to be as masculine as possible in classroom decor, which is humorous, ironic and geared toward guys. At the end of last semester my female administrative overseer told me to take it all down on the grounds that it wasn’t “appropriate.” Funny thing is, one of the posters was a quote from Of Mice and Men, which she didn’t know. I can’t wait to ask her next semester if reading OMAM wouldn’t be inappropriate and maybe should be taken off the sacred pacing guide by which all English teachers live and move and have their being.

  5. Bob Diethrich says:

    The article points out correctly that “there have always been much more female teachers in the teaching profession” and that is true. But these days so many of them are not married, nor do they have children of their own, and so they have almost no clue as to how boys’ and girls’ brains are wired differently, especially as their brains develop. Many of them don’t have the empirical evidence of their own children to observe. Couple that with the decidedly “feminist slant” at most ed schools and you do have trouble for males in the classroom.

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  1. […] I couldn’t agree more… Joanne Jacobs: Boys won’t be girls In her forthcoming book, 21st Century Boys, Palmer calls for more opportunities for boys and girls […]

  2. […] I couldn’t agree more… Joanne Jacobs: Boys won’t be girls In her forthcoming book, 21st Century Boys, Palmer calls for more opportunities for boys and girls […]

  3. […] I couldn’t agree more… Joanne Jacobs: Boys won’t be girlsIn her forthcoming book, 21st Century Boys, Palmer calls for more opportunities for boys and girls […]