Dutch doors to adulthood

Concluding its series on the Dutch education system, Open Education looks at a vocational school for future carpenters and woodworkers.

Whereas in America we continue to try and force feed students of all abilities and interests through a high school program that is almost entirely academic-based, the Dutch school system has created an extremely viable option for students who prefer hands on learning and a career in the skilled trades.

In the U.S., vocational programs must promise a college option to be politically viable.

About Joanne

Comments

  1. Walter E. Wallis says:

    A lot of our administrative overburden consists of jobs created to absorb grads who learned nothng signficant.

  2. “[T]he Dutch school system has created an extremely viable option for students who prefer hands on learning and a career in the skilled trades.”

    This isn’t necessarily true. Many of these students don’t “prefer” a career in the trades. Students are tested while in elementary school, and recommended a course of study based upon that, which is hardly the result of the student’s preference.

    A recent article has shown again, even after years of discrimination, that allochtonen students, despite receiving similar or higher marks than their autochtonen peers, were given advice for these lower forms of education.

    It has little to do with student preference and more to do with placing students where staff determines they belong on the social ladder.

Trackbacks

  1. […] Jacobs notes that not all countries have adopted the college über alles model. Of course, homeschoolers have […]