Majority backs NCLB

In a new national survey, 57 percent backed reauthorizing No Child Left Behind as is or with minimal changes. The survey was done by Hoover Institution’s Education Next and the Program on Education Policy and Governance (PEPG) at Harvard. Support goes to 71 percent if respondents are asked about “federal legislation” that holds schools accountable for student achievement rather than “No Child Left Behind.” However, only 42 percent of current and former public school employees support renewing NCLB with minimal or no changes.

Respondents gave mediocre grades to their local schools and even worse grades to public schools in general.

Specifically, 43 percent give the schools in their own community an A or a B, 38 percent give them a C, and 18 percent give a D or F. When asked about public schools around the nation, these grades drop. Just 22 percent give public schools in general an A or B, 55 percent, a C, and 24 percent, a D or F.

By large margins, respondents supported setting a national proficiency standard and requiring students to pass an exam to graduate from certain grades and to receive a high school diploma.

About Joanne

Comments

  1. This seems akin to a boss asking employees if everyone should get an extra week’s vacation each year while surreptitiously eliminating payraises for the best employees.

    It hardly seems surprising that a large majority of people support accountability. Plus I suspect the drop off in support from the general notion of standards to the specific NCLB legislation is at least partially political (tied to GWB). However, the devil is in the details and I’m certain that a substantal number of those surveyed (and by extension, the public at large) are relatively ignorant to those details. As with many large scale programs, I think these poll results speak more to certain beliefs and expectations and less to the actual support of NCLB.

  2. Working from Tom’s response – I think that the widespread ignorance among parents and others regarding the details of NCLB (as seen in this and just about every other survey) is the real story here. I’m baffled by how little interest the public takes in public education.

  3. Shame on you Joanne, for printing this drivel.

    This study is a perfect example of getting the conclusions you want before you even begin the study. One need look no further than the first question to see how useless this study is:

    As you may know, the No Child Left Behind Act requires states to set standards in math and reading and to test students each year to determine whether the standards are being met. This year, Congress is deciding whether to renew the No Child Left Behind Act. What do you think Congress should do?

    And its “alternate” version:

    . As you may know, federal legislation requires states to set standards in math and reading and to test students each year to determine whether the standards are being met. This year, Congress is deciding whether to renew this federal legislation. What do you think Congress should do?

    They claim with much glee they got nearly the same results as the ETS study released last week. Small wonder, they used basically the same “question”.

    Then there’s Question #2:

    Under No Child Left Behind, should there be a single national standard and a single national test for all students in the United States? Or do you think that there should be different standards and tests in different states?

    Too bad they forgot to mention a little thing called the Constitution, which does NOT give the federal govt. the power over education in this country, but very clearly spells out states’ rights.

    Remember all the fanfare over the $60 million ad campaign being run by the Gates and Broad Foundation. Here’s where they spent their money.

    Need more proof, how about this little statement under “Survey Methods”?

    Because KN offers members of its panel free Internet access and a WebTV device that connects to a telephone and television, the sample is not limited to current computer owners or users with Internet access

    In other words, we have a panel of respondents we bought off.

  4. Andy Freeman says:

    > Too bad they forgot to mention a little thing called the Constitution, which does NOT give the federal govt. the power over education in this country, but very clearly spells out states’ rights.

    I never thought that I’d see a public school advocate argue that federal money shouldn’t be spent on education.

    What? MiT thinks that the feds should give more money, he’s just objecting to them saying how it is spent?

    Money has strings. If you don’t like the strings, don’t take the money. (And yes, I think that the feds should stay out of education, money and all.)

  5. That’s right, Andy, states should tell the feds to drop dead on this one, as many KNOW they are spending more on the mandates than they receive from the feds.

    I’m not saying ALL federal involvement is bad. Look at what went on in prior to Public Law94142, where the needs of the handicapped were systematically ignored, until the federal govt. stepped in and forced the issue.

    However in this case, the powers that be in the fed. govt. are so corrupt they need to be dismissed. Witness the “alliance” between the Dept. of Ed and the Broad Foundation. The current administration is so hell bent on privatizing education, with taxpayer financed profits for their friends, that they’ll get in bed with anyone who is wanting to make some money.