Cincinnati schools block vouchers

Thousands of Cincinnati children who attend low-performing public schools are eligible for vouchers to attend private schools. But they may never know it because the district won’t release their addresses. In every other district in Ohio, eligible students get a postcard about how to apply for Ohio EdChoice Scholarships.

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Comments

  1. wayne martin says:

    > Thousands of Cincinnati children who attend low-performing
    > public schools are eligible for vouchers to attend private schools.
    > But they may never know it because the district won’t release
    > their addresses. In every other district in Ohio, eligible
    > students get a postcard about how to apply for Ohio EdChoice
    > Scholarships.

    Hmmm .. suppose the State Board of Education were to have the Governor issue an edict for the Cleveland School District to release the names of the students?

    Suppose the BoE were to sue the Cleveland School Board for release of the names/addresses?

    Suppose the DoE were to put a WEB-page up on its WEB-site with all the information, and then print up flyers for every student in Cleveland’s schools—delivering them to the schools for distribution to the student’s parents?

    Suppose the BoE were to buy some advertising time of Cleveland Radio, TV and print media proving a short statement of the issue and providing a URL to the DoE’s WEB-site?

    I suspect that the BoE could purchase the names of the kids in Cleveland schools from a Credit Reporting firm, like EquiFax—bypassing the Cleveland School District.

    There’s always a number of different ways to achieve most any goal, if you interested in seeing results in your lifetime.

  2. Prof210 says:

    I’m all in favor of giving students in schools with low achievement the option to attend other schools with higher-achieving students — other public schools if possible. But if my student were one of the Title I students to whom the option were extended, I don’t think I’d want our name and address made public — especially since the list would also be useful to providers of tutoring services in selling those services.

    I do agree with Wayne Martin that the availability of transfers and tutoring should be much better publicized. My own upper middle class district sent a cryptic letter to eligible families last year and gave them less than a week to apply.

  3. Or just compell the school district to inform these families of their options. In LAUSD there is open enrollment and every year we are required to distribute a booklet and other papers to inform students of their options.

    I can think of many reasons why a school or school district would want to hold onto its students — especially those most likely to leave who often are its most capable students with the most involved parents. Improving a school (at least in terms of those “objective” numbers) while losing some of your best students is probably virtually impossible. Too bad. School choice doesn’t mean the schools get to choose for the students. Education is the only way for these children to succeed. Educators must be advocates for students, not exploiters of them.

    This is not a question of finding a better school versus surrendering one’s privacy. Make the schools inform the students and parents. End of story….