A for attitude

Last week, in “The school did nothing and they gave me A’s,” I asked readers to advise “Adam,” a high school junior in southern California with good grades but poor English skills. A blog reader who’d corresponded with Adam via e-mail described him as bright and hard-working, but not prepared for college. I assumed he was a good student with a weakness in English, perhaps because it was a second language.

When Adam joined the comments, I learned his problems are much more serious. None of his A’s represent academic achievement, he writes. Adam had been placed in all special education classes in middle school, but was mainstreamed at Nogales High in the Rowland Unified district, which is east of Los Angeles. In his own words:

When the first REPORT CARD came it was all “A”s. My mom ask every teacher how is Adam getting an A if he was just taken out of Special Education classes.They reply as while as Director of Special Ed at Rowland distict said “WE HAVE BAD STUDENTS, WE GRADE ADAM ON ATTITUDE NOT ACADEMICS”.

All my teachers never thought [taught]. For English all he did was fight with the bad students and he even threw a chair one time, he always cuss.
Foe History all he did was put rated “R” movies on and sleep in class.
For math she said am passing Adam because he a good student, I have to many bad students. For science I got an “A” for selling candy and watching a goat, he never thought [taught].

MY MOM TOLD EVERYONE SHE WANTED ME TO LEARN AND BE PUT IN CLASSES THAT WILL HELP ME. THe school said “SO YOU DON’T WANT HIM WITH A HIGH SCHOOL DIAPLOMA”. My mom said yes but the importance is I am learning not the diaploma.

. . . I have not even pass my CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL EXIT EXAMINATION.(CAHSEE)

A reader asked if he’d tested out of special education and urged him to hire a lawyer. Adam answered:

No, I did not test out of Special Education. On my state test’s I get FAR BELOW AVERAGE. And in all my classes I get “F”s on my test and work, but they still give me an “A”. I ask my teachers why are you giving me an “A”. They reply we don’t have time to see if there right only if you did it.”WE GRADE ADAM ON ATTITUDE NOT ACADEMICS”

No my mom or I did not want this change. The school said we have bad students and Adam is a good student.

Adam has one meeting a year on his Individual Education Plan (IEP) and is assigned to one special education “resource” class.

But that is not helping me because the teacher is never going over class subjects. She is always on the phone or the computer, all she does is put movies on. At my IEP’s the school yells at me saying I am lieing and they don’t beleave me. And that I do bad on the state test on purpose. (I do not I do my best, because I now college look at the scores).

Adam appears to be caught in a Catch-22: His eagerness to learn means there’s no need to teach him. He’s written letters to the superintendent and the state education department, succeeding only in branding himself as a troublemaker.

Miriam Freedman, a specialist in special education law, (see School Law Pro and her blog) told me Adam can sue the school for failing to provide “a free and appropriate education.” She suggested he check out the WrightsLaw site. Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates is another resource. These sites have a lot of advice for parents who can wade through legal and education jargon in order to serve as advocates for their children or those who can afford to hire a lawyer or trained advocate.

Again, if readers have advice for Adam and his mother — especially if you know lawyers in the Los Angeles area — please let me know. This young man wants an education.

About Joanne

Comments

  1. Independent George says:

    While I’m sympathetic to Adam, and think he’s clearly been wronged by his school, I don’t see how lawyering the issue will help anyone.

    I have no idea what the right answer is, but the primary issue is right now is how can he get the education he was cheated out of over the past twelve years, and not how he can be gain restitution from the courts. Two years of legal wrangling accomplishes nothing while setting him back even further.

  2. Independent George, lawyering is probably the only way to get Adam what he needs. It’s likely that the mere presence of a lawyer at Adam’s next meeting with the school system will increase the chances that he will get what he needs from them.

    Also, it may not be that he was cheated out of education at his previous school.

  3. I hate to say it, but I am a natural born skeptic. Do we know for sure that Adam is “real”?

    Something just doesn’t sit right.

    His spelling mistakes in his posts tend to be random. Some difficult words he spells well, then he makes mistakes on easy ones.

    His grammar comes across as “forced”?

    He protects his identity, but singles out his school and school district.

    Despite being in special education, he seems to be pretty knowledgeable about the education system.

    He uses a lot of stereotypes in describing his school

    It seems a little bit far fetched that all of his teachers would give him “A’s” despite him failing every class. The odds of getting six teachers who would do this, even in a bad school have to be pretty slim.

  4. Pat Patterson says:

    While as a taxpayer I doesn’t want to see any successful lawsuit but as a former resource teacher I would urge the student to go ahead. It indeed may be too late for him at his current school but others might benefit.

    The large district I was in routinely hid students in Resource classes and basically told me to grade them according to the goals of the IEP or not considering that in many cases the student hadn’t had an IEP or any legitimate parent IEP meetings since elementary school. Which often were done by the aide or a sub brought in to do them. Yes, I know against the law and I refused and attempted to do them myself. Then, surprise, surprise, my aide was reassigned until I turned the IEP task to others.

  5. I don’t even want to see him sue, but I want the district to believe he will.

  6. RORY: Yes it is hard to beleave that a student like me will get all A’s and get F’s on test and work. But it is thr truth. yes I give me districts name but I have to protect my name because the school will get revenge. Because I reported them they have told me I Can’t join nothing at there school, not even touch the computers. If you only new, if you saw the video I found on the web, you will see what kind of school I went to. It shows a honors history teacher letting two students fight in class, the teacher is laughing and leting people film it. I am rell and I beleave that school is my key to success.

  7. I will like to thank everyone for your advice

  8. First you need to find an advocate, well versed in the ins and outs of special ed and that can sit in at an IEP meeting with you and your mom. I believe if your mom feels that your needs aren’t being met, as your legal guardian, she has a right to request a meeting outside of the annual IEP review to reassess your situation.

    You should also find out what exactly your IEP covers…there may be restrictions on how they grade you, thus accounting for the “A for effort” as ridiculous as it sounds.

  9. wayne martin says:

    > RORY: Yes it is hard to beleave that a student
    > like me will get all A’s and get F’s on test and
    > work. But it is thr truth. yes I give me districts
    > name but I have to protect my name because
    > the school will get revenge.

    Given the level of language achievement of this student, there is no way that he can survive in college.

    > Because I reported them they have told me I Can’t
    > join nothing at there school, not even touch
    > the computers.

    Not certain what this is supposed to mean, but if you reported them once and there really is some retaliation—then report them again.

    This is a list of links to the LA libraries:

    http://www.colapublib.org/libs/

    These libraries have computers, if you don’t have one at home.

    It would be worth talking to the Army to see if this person’s education is sufficient to allow joining up. Going to Junior College for a semester or two isn’t going to get this youth into a decent college. Best recognize that he’s in a “heap of trouble” and begin a path along a different path.

  10. Actually, Wayne Martin, I have seen students whose writing was like this show dramatic improvement and, in a few years, become ready for college.

    Being a year or two or three (or whatever) behind grade level does not mean needing that many years to catch up.

    What I think “Adam” has going for him is a degree of passion, of conviction. An urgency to communicate is one of the most powerful elements in learning to communicate effectively.

  11. wayne martin says:

    > Being a year or two or three (or whatever) behind grade
    > level does not mean needing that many years to catch up.

    And who pays the bill? The taxpayer?

    This person has written virtually the same thing with each posting, although with different misspellings. If he isn’t getting any help from his parents .. it’s not likely he’s going to get help in school either.

    There are any number of on-line sources that are available to him. Seems to me he would be well-advised to find a remedial writing course on-line and see what happens.

    There also are apprentice programs that he should consider investigating.

    “Passion” is probably not a sufficient resource to make up for this damage and compete successfully in a decent college/university.

  12. Twilight says:

    Hidden learning disabilities are rather a commodity within the public system. This is exactly what happens when districts across the nation are run as businesses rather than meeting any students needs. It is more about the money, and the marketing to make the districts look good in their communities. While parents have a long term investment in the success of each of their children, schools have a short term investment. Rare is the staff member who will truly go to bat for these kids as they are scared of the almighty union. Administration looks at the bottomline of cost containment. In some states there are legal groups that will give you free advice and their main goal is to protect the rights of the child and the parents.

  13. I’ll have to admit that I agree a bit with Rory. Something sounds off in this story.

    But if I were to take it at face value, I’d first try to find out why he went from special ed in middle school (I’m assuming not just resource, but a specific track) and then got placed in regular ed with resource. His final IEP at the middle school was where that decision was made. Clearly, that’s not working.

    With every IEP a pamphlet is handed to the parents on legal rights that they have to challenge the findings of the IEP. Also, with an IEP comes access to extra testing that might reveal what learning obstacles the kid has. Did Adam take any of these tests (tests might be the Weschler’s, Woodcock-Johnson,etc.) that measures actual IQ processes and not just scholastic achievement? I believe the school would be required to test him if the parent requested. This would go a long way in determining what his placement should’ve been all along.

    Beyond that, the school sounds pretty shabby any way you look at it.

    The movie thing is actually pretty common in a lot of schools. It is often used as incentive to get work done by the end of the week, but it is about as stupid an idea as one can have. Here you have kids who need many times the practice of regular kids, working at half their speed for various reasons, and then taking a fifth of the school year off to watch bad movies. My son’s middle school finally dropped the practice a few years ago.

  14. I believe that several people have offered to help “Adam”, if he is for real then I am sure that he will contact someone soon.

    If this is all a big scam as I suspect, then the story will ruin the credibility of education reform bloggers.

    Just my 2 cents.

  15. wayne martin says:

    > This is exactly what happens when districts across
    > the nation are run as businesses rather than meeting
    > any students needs.

    This is a typical “school people” point-of-view. Businesses operate in an arena called “competition”. Customers are able to find competing sources of goods/services and make choices based on quality, value and price. Companies that fail to meet their customers’ needs eventually go out-of-business. Businesses either meet the needs of their customers of they fail to exist. Perhaps they don’t fail overnight, but their time on this earth is limited. Schools are operated so that “going-out-of-business” is not an option, so,by definition–schools are not run “as businesses”.

  16. I’m quite confident “Adam” is who he says he is. He was introduced to me by a real-person blog reader, who’s met him. I’ve since exchanged e-mails with him and know his name. He may not be a complete and accurate reporter of facts — few people are — but I don’t think he’s making up his story.

    Ask teachers if some schools grade special ed students on attitude and effort rather than academics, because it’s assumed they’re doing the best they can. Ask why so many special ed students pass all their classes but can’t pass their state graduation exam, even though the hardest questions require eighth- or ninth-grade skills. Ask if low-income and working-class parents find it difficult to navigate the special ed system.

  17. wayne martin says:

    > This is exactly what happens when districts across
    > the nation are run as businesses rather than meeting
    > any students needs.

    This is a typical “school people” point-of-view. Business operate in an arena called “competition”. Customers are able to find competing sources of goods/services and make choices based on quality, value and price. Companies that fail to meet their customers’ needs eventually go out of business. Businesses either meet the needs of their customers of they fail to exist. Perhaps they don’t fail overnight, but their time on this earth is limited. Schools are operated so that “going-out-of-business” is an option—so by definition, schools can not be run “as businesses”.

    > Ask teachers if some schools grade special ed students on attitude
    > and effort rather than academics, because it’s assumed they’re doing
    > the best they can. Ask why so many special ed students pass all their
    > classes but can’t pass their state graduation exam, even though the
    > hardest questions require eighth- or ninth-grade skills. Ask if
    > low-income and working-class parents find it difficult to navigate
    > the special ed system.

    Ask any teacher anything, and she will eventually say that education is “under-funded” and/or some variation of this theme.

    > Ask why so many special ed students pass all their
    > classes but can’t pass their state graduation exam

    Maybe this is one of those cases where the Exit Test might not be the best thing for the student, the school and the school system. If “Special Education” is intended to facilitate students who are, for whatever reason, unable to compete in a “normal” class room setting—then perhaps it is impossible to develop a meaningful test for SpEd students that most can pass.

    This topic about whether SpEd students should be required to do an Exit test has gone around last year. If memory serves, the California Superintendent of Education wanted SpEd kids to take the Exit test, even though the failure rate was fairly high. Has there really been any good public review of these tests and the difficulty that students are having passing them?

    SpEd routinely consumes about 15-25% of every school district’s budget—but the budget documents rarely make that clear. This high cost distorts many simple statistics about cost-of-education. The number of students in SpEd is a little hard to determine, but indirect data suggests that up to 10% of the enrollment is in some type of SpEd Which leads us to the question, how much money should the public be expected to fund the “Special Education” of students with learning disabilities who can not, for the most part, be corrected by SpEd? And of course, the follow-on question needs to be asked also–what level of academic performance can we expect from these kids based at any level of funding?

  18. I defer to Joanne, though without a complete and accurate accounting of the facts it’s hard to make any sort of recommendation.

    I am not sure of the reason for aninomity since he already says he is “banned” from the computers at school and not allowed to join any clubs.

    I also think its funny that he got in trouble for trying to email the District Administrator because there are no email acccording to the district website. Perhaps it is available to students and not to the general public.

    Though it is predominantly hispanic, the school system seems to be pretty well regarded and didn’t set off any bells when I reviewed its School Report Card. In fact when compared to simular schools it ranked a 9 on a scale of 1 to 10.

    The school also has after school academic tutoring available to all students who desire it.

    I am sure phone calls to the following people would clear up this pretty fast.

    Superintendent’s Office – (626) 854-8300, Dr. Maria G. Ott

    Secondary Schools Division – (626) 854-8317, Dr. A.J. Santorufo

    Dr. Nancy Padilla, Principal (626) 965-3437 ext. 3500

    To file a complaint or for more information, contact the Coordinator of Special Projects, Special Projects Office, Rowland Unified School District, 1830 Nogales Street, Rowland Heights, CA 91748; telephone: (626) 965-2541, ext. 8390.

  19. To me, part of that answer (or testing for special ed) could come straight from the Benchmarks in each IEP that parents and schools have agreed to.

    For instance, if little Johnny is in the 7th grade and is reading at a third grade level then his benchmark for the next year is going to be to push beyond that, perhaps to 4th and 5th grade skills. It does no good to hand that child a test in which he is expected to read and comprehend on a 7th grade level when he hasn’t been exposed to that level for the obvious reason that he is still unable to read even 4th/5th or 6th grade books.

    That is where he is. That is what he and the school should be tested on if special ed is to be tested at all.

    Even without developing a new test for special ed, simply respecting what their IEPs say and testing those things would be a good start.

    So, one way to find out whether Johnny had achieved that particular reading benchmark might be to hand him a 4th grade reading test to see if the job had been done. It may not be perfect, but it is certainly going to give more information to parents and teachers then sending these kids into testing situations that are miles over their head.

    They already make modifications such as reading the test to kids who have severe reading issues. But the test is still on subjects years over their head, so scores are always rock bottom and tell the parents nothing. Except that they have a problem. Which they already know.

    But that should be only reserved for true special ed kids and it does sound like some of these schools are doing a poor job of educating the marginal kids who are not truly special ed and then dumping them in those classes at a later date when they don’t perform.

    And yes, it is all-honor-roll-all-the-time in special ed because they do face an extraordinary amount of failure on a daily basis. Again, I’m speaking of true special ed, probably the bottom 3-5%. At a time when kids are celebrating with graduation parties and college plans, a large portion of these kid’s parents will be hunting for a lawyer to draw up guardianship papers. They really won’t be taking any top jobs or slots at college because someone gave them a high school diploma.

  20. The funny stuff about IEPs is that sometimes people hold that the kid can’t be penalized in his grade for any skill related to his disability. So although Adam shouldn’t be skating through not being taught anything, it’s possible that his grade might not every suffer because of the errors he makes.

    I think Adam is real, but I think there’s more to the story. However, if the story is even half accurate as Adam has reported it, he needs a lawyer to advance his interest.

    I hope for the taxpayers’ sake that he doesn’t have to sue and win the suit to get what he needs, but if the school is this unresponsive and apparently punitive, external pressure is required.

  21. To Rory:
    Mr.Rory thank you for the numbers. I have contact Dr.Santorufo the Assistant Superintendent last year, he does not do nothing, he does not even teturn my phone calls. I got suspended for useing a computer that my teacher gave permission to use, not for emailing.I was told I can’t touch or use the computer because I reported them. They tell my mom she has no rights that they have more power. That she has to sign the iep they told here.They always try to tell her bad stuff if she did not sign.

  22. Rory, I too have looked at “Adam’s” school district online and while it makes his claim’s seem surprising, such numeric distinctions never tell the whole story.

    It is possible that most of the students in this school and district are being served, reasonably well, and that “Adam” is the exception. Which doesn’t excuse it.

    He mentioned the failure of his own teachers along with an “honors history” teacher who was videotaped allowing students to fight.

    That represents a small percentage of the faculty, the rest of whom may or may not be competent — but probably (at least some of not most) are…

    I have taught in situations where the teacher next door was a disgrace, where I felt ashamed to be his or her colleauge, embarrassed that the school at which I taught allowed such malpractice.

    My sense about “Adam” is that he has been “mainstreamed” into classes where he is receiving little instruction and he and his mother want him to receive more individualized instruction.

    It is surprising that a school or school district would put up such resistance and commit acts of retribution when all they have to do is move him to another class or find him time with a resourse teacher. It is more expedient to appease irate parents — unless the thing they are demanding is outrageously expensive.

    The mainstream-as-soon-as-possible movement has probably been a good thing for a lot of students for many reasons, social and intellectual, but that doesn’t mean it’s the right thing for everyone. That is a problem with a lot of policies and policy shifts. They do not always consider the individual differences and learning styles and needs of students. I’ve had special ed students in my classes over the years and I think they’ve all benefitted from having access to my curriculum. Some have actually gone on to college because they worked damn hard and wanted it (and, admittedly, because some colleges have lowered standards in the last few decades). But I’m not sure that means that mainstreaming is the answer for everyone all the time. And when kids are mainstreamed they should not be arbitrarily placed in just any classroom. But then again, who should be placed in a classroom with a second-rate teacher?

    Not my kid — nor anyone else’s….

    This is probably a longshot but there is a Los Angeles County Office of Education which deals in special education services and says that they act as intermediary with school districts, whatever that means….

    I don’t know if they can help “Adam” and his mother but here is the phone number: 1-562-803-8306…. I would ask for special education services and see where it all leads. Perhaps they at least know of some oversight agency. Since the goal here ought to be getting him what he needs and not bankrupting the school district, a lawyer might not be necessary….

  23. He needs a lawyer to help interpret Special Education law and explain to him and his family a) what they are entitled to and b) what provisions of the law will assist in getting his needs met.

    You can believe that the district has their own lawyers. Getting a lawyer in Special Ed usually isn’t about money, it’s about the fact that Special Ed law is extremely complicated and it helps to have a trained professional interpret it. Most parents find it difficult to navigate its ins and outs by themselves.

    Again, I am sure that the school district has a team of lawyers guiding their Special Education practice — why would we criticize Adam for getting his own?

  24. Valerie Vanaman!

    She’s a genius.

    I assume she’s still working; she could get anything done (and will tell you if she can’t).

    She works on contingency.

    Here she is:

    Valerie Vanaman

    They should use our names (Ed Berenson & Catherine Johnson).

    They don’t need to use our names, of course!

    But if they do, they should tell Valerie ED & CATHERINE say hi!

  25. hmmm… I thought I left a comment on this thread….

    The lawyer to contact is:

    Valerie Vanaman
    Newman.Aaronson.Vanaman
    http://www.navlaw.net/contactUs.shtml
    14001 Ventura Boulevard
    Sherman Oaks, CA 91423
    Phone: (818)990-7722
    Fax: (818)501-1306

    Brilliant woman; works on contingency; will tell you straight what she can and can’t do.

    Here’s Valerie:

    One of the evening’s honorees was Valerie Vanaman, an attorney whose relentless advocacy on behalf of special-needs education has improved the lives of thousands of children and their families.

    “Every child is entitled to receive an appropriate educational program,” Vanaman said during her award acceptance speech. It is such a simple idea, but like most simple ideas, it takes people of great intellect to conceive it and men and women of iron will to implement it.

    http://www.jewishjournal.com/home/searchview.php?id=15281

  26. We spent years in the LA system.

    It’s war.

    Period.

  27. Recently I reunited with an old LA friend who told me her district simply didn’t provide classes or transition studies (transition to the work world) for her high-functioning son.

    They were plainly required to do so by law.

    Didn’t do it; didn’t care to do it.

    Her husband is an attorney; he could bring suit; they could afford to bring suit.

    School still didn’t do it.

    So her husband brought suit.

    My friend said “The school is your enemy. You don’t want to think so, but it is.”

  28. We’ve had some major abuses here in Irvington, too — though at the moment my own kids are in very good hands. (They have terrific teachers; the issue for us is always at district level.)

    Last fall the district left Jimmy’s class — these are all transition-age developmentally disabled students who are required by law to have “transition programs” — sitting in the basement of the high school for six weeks because they didn’t have a bus.

    $19,000 per pupil spending and the disabled kids can sit in the basement.

    We couldn’t get any of the other parents in the class to help; a couple of them had just come into the school from other districts that were so much worse than ours they didn’t want to rock the boat or cause offense.

    So as usual, we were it.

    We went to see an attorney; his consulting fee, if we’d hired him, was going to be $3000 to start.

    He told us what to say and do, and of course I was writing about the situation on the blog and in postings to the Irvington Parents Forum.

    Ed was ferocious.

    In theory, BOCES (long story) was supposed to supply the bus, not our school. (No idea why. If BOCES doesn’t supply the bus, obviously our district has to supply the bus.)

    So they were waiting.

    Every time we’d contact them they’d say “We’re still waiting.”

    Ed pushed things to the wall and we got the bus.

    But we were the ONLY parents willing and able to get in their face and say “Do what the law requires you to do.”

  29. btw, lawyers are often a HUGE help to the beleaguered head of special ed who’s trying to get things done.

    All the special ed folks we met loved Valerie.

    She’d come in to a meeting with us and folks would relax. They knew she’d get it done. They’d shoot the breeze, talk about their weight a little, then hammer out a plan.

  30. sorry – comment blitz – I realize I wasn’t clear about Jimmy’s class sitting in the basement.

    What they were supposed to be doing was going to a job training program at the Marriott Hotel once a week.

    once a week

    Job training is critical for these kids. They MUST have it.

    They were sitting in the school basement instead.

    They would have sat there all year if we hadn’t hammered them. And it had to be hammering. contra Rory (Rory! What were you thinking! You should know better!) a phone call won’t do it.

    EVER.

    We finally got things done after:

    a) seeing an attorney
    b) sending a registered letter using the language he gave us and ccing the attorney
    c) holding a face to face meeting in which we made clear we were unhappy with every conceivable activity going on in the district

    This was in the wake of 6 weeks of emails and phone calls.

    We’re talking about a town of 6500 residents.

  31. Chanda Smith decree (Valerie was part of this):

    http://legalminds.lp.findlaw.com/list/edlaw/msg00005.html

  32. wayne martin says:
  33. wayne martin says:

    > I realize I wasn’t clear about
    > Jimmy’s class sitting in the basement.

    > What they were supposed to be doing was going to a
    > job training program at the Marriott Hotel once a week.
    > once a week

    > Job training is critical for these kids. They MUST have it.
    > They were sitting in the school basement instead.

    This additional information is interesting, but not particularly helpful. Lots of questions—

    What job training was going on at a Hotel? Was a room being rented for job training teacher to provide training to this group? What was so important about the hotel space? Could the teacher come to the high school where the kids were? If not, why not? Small buses are very inexpensive.. running from $35-$50 hour in some cases. Even if the cost was as much as $200/day, this would seem like a small amount to pay. Who had spending authority for decisions like this one?

    The point about job training being critical I agree with. A fellow I know who teaches autistic kids says that most of them can be trained to perform minimal jobs by the time they are ready to enter the work force. He points out that without the more expensive SpEd training, they would never function effectively in later life.

  34. Rory:

    I’m also a natural born skeptic. I have to wonder if you’re really a teacher. Every post you’ve made has had a grammar or spelling mistake in it.

    >It seems a little bit far fetched that all of his teachers would give him “A’s” despite him failing every class,

    >I believe that several people have offered to help “Adam”, if he is for real then I am sure that he will contact someone soon.

    >aninomity

    We all make the odd mistake and this is certainly not a formal place where correctness is absolutely required. Still, it’s odd that there would be something in every post. Are you who you say you are?

    (for those who are humor challenged, this is sarcasm)

  35. Rory-I understand your skepticism, but you would be surprised how numbers and “school” report info is gathered. I had no idea how the system in CA works, but in the state I currently work in (right next to CA), the administrators of the individual schools fills out the “report cards.” Everything. To check achievement data, one should only have to search for test results at the state board of ed site. No one proofs or corrects what the administrator punches in UNLESS it sends up red flags. This is caused by too many departments within the department of ed, which are understaffed and overworked (mainly due to their own or the legislature’s innane requirements).

    Everyone-as for SPED kids going from sped classes to normal classes, it could be simply lack of paperwork flowing between the two campuses OR the high school is an INCLUSION high school. My HS is all inclusive. We have resource rooms, but the kids are scheduled in regular classes and the sped aides must work to check on them and pull them out when necessary. We have 2500 students (with 100+ sped kids) and three aides.

    Adam-There is no excuse for what you have dealt with. Get help. Get it now. Good luck.

    Everyone-I wondered about the same issue (suing schools for failing to provide an education) but for normal students. I fear the day is soon coming if we continue to show statistics like the current NAEP versus grades issue. I shudder at the thought, but I myself would have issues if my daughter did not get the education she should! I, however, can advocate for her-but many parents don’t know how to-especially when AUTHORITY FIGURES are telling them what they want to hear or that they will make trouble for them.

  36. Adam – in addition to seeking legal aid, look for helpful teachers at your school. With stats like it has, there should be SOME of them there somewhere! They may be willing to tutor you. I know I would be glad to have a student who wanted to learn and would be willing to work at it!

  37. Thank you everyone for your advice. Here is the continue of my school.
    My school Nogales High School is in Program Inprovement whitch in California means you are in crisis. Last year we had five principles, this year we got one. My school has fallen below state average, you can call the district to find this out to.

    At my first year at Nogales High School, I was tripped by someone, I did not see who did but I new it was on purpose, because the person who droped me his friend said “thats mest up”…he responded “SO”. I broke my two front teeth, I was so much in pain that I did not turn around to see who did it.

    I went to the nurses office, I told her that someone triped me on purpose. She called the campus securtiy she had to call over three times intell one came in to use the restroom, I told him and the nurse told him it was on “purpose”. He naver made a police report.

    I went back to him the campus securty officer, I told him why did he not make a police report, he responded “YOU SAID IT WAS ON ACCIDENT”.

    I had a meeting with Assistant Superintendent Dr.Santorufo and Officer and the Nurse. The campus securty officer name Estrada said “Adam is a lie’er,lie’er” he was yelling this to me. So Dr.Santorufo calles the nurse in she say “ADAM TOLD HIM IT WAS ON PURPOSE”….he still called me a lie’er but then he said “O” “YEA I DO REMEBER YOU SAID IT WAS ON PURPOSE”. He did not get in trouble and Dr.Santoufo did nothing about it. My two front teeth are broken, and the school lied about it too.

    If my school fails our California Standardize test againe, we will be taken over by the state. When I mention the name Nogales High School in my community they say “You go to that bad school”. If you live in my community everyone nows that Nogales High is a bad school to send your children to. There is gang cuffitting all over. Everytime
    I go to the restroom it smells like smoking.