No job fair at UCSC

University of California at Santa Cruz has canceled a job fair until it can figure out how to protect military recruiters from rowdy protesters. In the past, yelling, spitting and fruit-throwing protesters have blocked access to military recruiters.

Companies can find other campuses at which to recruit, observes Darren at Right on the Left Coast.

Enjoy the drive from Santa Cruz, you student morons, while you go track those companies down.

It’s hard to believe military recruiters are missing out on any hot prospects at UCSC, but I guess they don’t want to appear intimidated.

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Comments

  1. Walter E. Wallis says:

    Arresting and expelling isn’t enough?
    Perhaps we need to go futher and cut federal funding if any government representative is denied entry to the campus or kept from doing her/his duty. At the very least, the participants must never be allowed any federal employment of benefit.

  2. wayne martin says:

    > “Our campus has a strong tradition of supporting
    > free speech and the right to demonstrate peacefully,”

    A walk through the history of the Vietnam War on this campus might tell a different story.

    > an Office of Student Affairs statement read Tuesday.
    > However, over the past two years, nearly every quarter
    > has included events in which a few individuals chose
    > to push their protests beyond civility and safety.”

    Two years is more than enough time to produce a policy that deals with violent protestors. Having adequate police presence, arrests and expulsion are all within the power of the University. Certainly State law would back up these University Administration powers.

    Shutting down the Job Faire makes a lot of sense, although with the Internet (WEB and email) it’s not clear how valuable these events are.

  3. I’ve used the job fairs at UCSC to recruit into my graduate program so they’re very useful to me. I feel sorry for the students – it’s not easy to leave a UC and get a job. The university does little to support that path (they get more milage out of sending people to professional school) and cancelling job fairs will make it that much harder for their new grads.

  4. Michael Lopez says:

    Well, you wouldn’t think to find good recruits at Wesleyan in Connecticut, either, but there’s one or two every year.

  5. Maybe the military should expand their academies? If they want college grads, would it not serve their purposes to recruit more of the best and the brightest before they graduate and seek employment?

    I laughed at the recruiters I encountered at my university’s post graduation job fair because an acquaintance of mine entered the Army after acquiring a Master’s in Psychology, hoping to earn a medical degree. Unfortunately for him, he performed a little to well in a “temporary” supply position, and they kept him there…to the extent of denying him access to the instruction that he wanted.

    I went on to ask if either of these guys held an advanced degree…nope. But hey, they held out hope to earn one after their retirement. That’s when I suggested they stay away from Marketing.

    The blockheads tried to pick a fight with me in a restaurant bar later that evening.

    Yep, it’s those damned college kids that are the violent bunch.

  6. wayne martin says:

    > Maybe the military should expand their academies?
    A good point.
    > If they want college grads, would it not serve their purposes
    > to recruit more of the best and the brightest before they
    > graduate and seek employment?

    Traditionally the Services have run Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs in select colleges/universities. Since the Vietnam era, having the Military that keeps America safe on Campus has been so revolting to certain “elites”, that these programs have been driven off some campuses.

    The Military obtains officers from their Academies, ROTC, Officer Candidate Schools (OCS) and Direct Commissions. Additionally, Warrant Officers are generally commissioned from the ranks of enlisted personnel.

    The number of new officers needed per year is a function of the size of the various branches, and whether the country is in a peace posture, or a war-time posture.

    > I laughed at the recruiters I encountered at my university’s
    > post graduation job fair

    How gracious of you ..

    > because an acquaintance of mine
    > entered the Army after acquiring a Master’s in Psychology,
    > hoping to earn a medical degree. Unfortunately for him, he
    > performed a little to well in a “temporary” supply position,
    > and they kept him there…to the extent of denying him
    > access to the instruction that he wanted.

    The modern Military tends to be “contract-driven”, meaning that they will guarantee training in various fields of endeavor. If you don’t get a contract before enlisting, it’s not likely they you will get one later. If you don’t get the contract you want, then there is no reason to enlist believing you will be given training or opportunities you want.

    > I went on to ask if either of these guys held an
    > advanced degree…nope.

    Many career officers ( after 7-10 years) earn their Masters at Staff College, or are given time off (with pay) to pursue an advanced degree.

    > But hey, they held out hope to earn one after their retirement.

    Since many retire after 20 years of active service, starting a second career is not unknown to most military retirees. With on-line classes leading to advanced degrees, as well as an excellent military education system, it’s possible to earn an Advanced degree from any posting in the world these days. Lots of retirees find second careers where advanced degrees aren’t needed, such as real estate sales, retail management and outdoorsy kinds of work. There was a time that retired military officers took jobs as high school math, physics or history teachers, although I expect that this is not the case any more.