‘In ___ we trust’

At Liberty Elementary School in Texas, the yearbook featured an enlarged nickel — with “In God We Trust” edited out. The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports:

Janet Travis, principal of Liberty Elementary School in Colleyville, wanted to avoid offending students of different religions, a district spokesman said. Students were given stickers with the words that could be affixed to the book if they so chose.

. . . The nickel design features President Jefferson and the word Liberty in cursive, with the words “In God We Trust” along the right edge.

A parent who complained about the edited nickel “suggested that the school could have used a different symbol for liberty, such as the Liberty Bell or the Statue of Liberty, if it was concerned about giving offense,” reports the Star-Telegram. But the PTA president “said those symbols may not be acceptable to everyone, either.”

Here’s a news flash: Nothing is acceptable to everyone. Changing American traditions to avoid offense is offensive to traditionalists.

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Comments

  1. maybe if ‘in God we trust’ offends they can go someplace else and earn their money

  2. BadaBing says:

    In the Age of Oprah, there are two mighty sins: (1) racism, and (2) religion.

  3. I suspect that people who pursue careers in K-12 school administration tend to have a higher than average need for security, coupled with some pretty strong tendencies toward conformity.

  4. Wayne Martin says:

    Right after 9/11 when a lot of American flags were flying, some college librarians refused to provide any display of “Old Glory” — claiming “it might offend non-Americans”.

    It’s so sad that these sorts of people have managed to gain positions of decision makers in our society. The legacy of the ’60s, I suppose. Some of my friends are WWII vets .. they just shake their heads and wonder “what were we fighting for?”.

  5. Sigivald says:

    Which “other religions” would “In God We Trust” offend?

    Only polytheists/pantheists, no? Everyone else who subscribes to a religion at all would be a monotheist, and since the specific God is not mentioned, it shouldn’t be inherently offensive to Jews or Muslims (neither of which groups are, to my knowledge, typically offended by the phrase).

    Given that that elementary school is very unlikely to have a huge population of Hindus or Animists, what’s the farkin’ problem?

    (And that assumes that said Hindus or Animists would be offended by a reproduction of a coin because it had that motto, which seems more insulting to them than the motto itself could ever be. It’s not my experience that Hindus in the US are terribly offended by other people being monotheists.)

  6. This has nothing to do with sensitivity or respect for other cultures. Those are just vehicles. The goal is expressions/examples of moral/intellectual/aesthetic/fashion superiority.

    These sorts of acts have as much in common with broadmindedness as a rollercoaster ride has with skydiving. There are sensations in common but that’s about it. There’s no danger in these acts so they require no courage. No skill is required so no tedious effort is necessary.

    I figure some time in the future Disney will add a Birmingham Bridge ride. It’ll be complete with water cannons and police dogs but no one gets wet and no one gets bitten. Perfect for liberal parents who want to introduce their kids to the delights of riskless courage.

    I imagine there’ll probably be souvenir Freedom Rider lapel pins.

  7. Jack Tanner says:

    When my son started school there was an orientation and the teacher apologized about 20 times for having the kids say the Pledge of Allegiance which is required by state law.

  8. Indigo Warrior says:

    photoncourier:
    I suspect that people who pursue careers in K-12 school administration tend to have a higher than average need for security, coupled with some pretty strong tendencies toward conformity.

    Yes, and more importantly, enforcement of conformity.

  9. Wayne Martin says:

    > When my son started school there was an
    > orientation and the teacher apologized
    > about 20 times for having the kids say
    > the Pledge of Allegiance which is required
    > by state law.

    It might be interesting to call this teacher and find out exactly for what reason he/she was apologizing?

  10. Indigo Warrior says:

    Atheists, agnostics, and pantheists such as myself could always consider that “In God We Trust” refers to the pantheistic “Nature’s God” of the Deists, mentioned in the Declaration of Independence.

  11. Except that atheists don’t believe in “nature’s god”, either. We have no god to trust in.