A painted ogre

Mr. AB actually learned art in his “unprofessional development” class on Arts in the Classroom. Half the day was wasted, but in the other half he learned to draw. Instead of quitting training, he came every day but Wednesday. No art class on Wednesday.

I hereby swear, I will never disavow the import of arts in the classroom again. If I, who value my vacation nigh as much as life itself, am willing to sit through 3 hours a day of frustration and indignation for the chance to make a paper-mache ogre, surely we can see the value for 10 year olds. Likewise, if I, a professional, am willing to cut my professional classes to sleep-in because I know that the chance to paint said ogre has been put off until Thursday, how can I expect better behavior from my kids?

Mr. AB also shares lowlights of the course.

Because credentialed CA teachers are not familiar with standards, we had to be taught about them through something we are all more acquainted with: baking a cake. Not just a verbal analogy, used in the midst of a 5 minute lecture, mind you. No no. It was a 2 day, 2 hour lesson involving real cake making materials, real cake and, my personal anti-favorite, a real faux-singing of “Happy Birthday” to a poor, lost-looking cafeteria worker. At no point, I might add, were we given more than 5 minutes to actually look at the arts standards.

I made an excellent monster puppet in summer camp when I was six. Sadly, it was the peak of my artistic career.

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Comments

  1. I made an excellent monster puppet in summer camp when I was six. Sadly, it was the peak of my artistic career.

    You seem to have done pretty well with words so I wouldn’t worry about it too much. Frances Mayes writes in a somewhat romantic but compelling way about her thoughts on the difference between the art of writing and “art” in one of the essays in Bella Tuscany.

    For me, it was the science that kept me coming back for more – I sit through 6 hours of English, History, Art and other uninteresting things for a chance to dissect a frog or look at a leaf under the microscope. It takes all kinds.