National what? Association

The National Education Association’s agenda for its national assembly has little to do with education, observes Captain’s Quarters and Michelle Malkin. Two items in the top 30 deal directly with education, writes the Captain. Instead, the NEA is busy opposing Wal-Mart, calling for withdrawal from Iraq and working to defeat the Central American Free Trade Agreement.

Well, the NEA’s top 15 list does include demonizing Eli Broad, whose foundation has given $400 million to improve urban education. Broad belongs to EdVoice, a bipartisan California group that wants to give mayors the power to appoint school boards in troubled urban districts.

Meanwhile, the American Federation of Teachers is trying to modify No Child Left Behind, not kill it, Education Week reports:

So instead of just finding fault with the law, AFT leaders have been working to come up with suggested alternatives even before the reauthorization process, scheduled for 2007, begins. It featured, for example, articles by respected education experts on standards and accountability in the spring issue of its American Educator journal.

AFT is raising serious issues but coming to the debate awfully late, notes Eduwonk, who’s tanned, rested and ready for blogging.

About Joanne

Comments

  1. Mr. Davis says:

    late.

    I love fill-in-the-blanks.

  2. Michelle Malkin..Isn’t she the columnist who belatedly supported internment camps for Japanese Americans? I’d be honored to have her oppose anything I supported.

    I’m glad the NEA opposes Wal-Mart. A store that pays its employees so poorly they can’t afford health insurance, that they need to apply for food stamps, that they need to be placed on Medicaid, that they need to live in vans…Dick Cheney might think that’s tthe best company in America, but I think it’s among the worst.

    Anyone who wants to know what it’s like to work at Wal-Mart ought to read Nickel and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenriech. And anyone who can’t see the connection between bettering the lives of working Americans and education…well, they need to be educated.

  3. BadaBing says:

    The leftist is a creature that seeks to politicize and wrap its tentacles around everything. In an earlier era it was called a Marxist-Leninist. Then it morphed into a Stalinist. Later it became a Maoist. Now it calls itself a neo-Marxist or a progressive and uses as its base seemingly benign institutions such as the NEA.

  4. argumentum ad hominem

  5. rightwinger says:

    My comment is to ag2828.

    What if anything does this have to do with teaching our children? In my estimation absolutely nothing.

    From what I’ve been reading all they want to teach the kids is political correctness. They can get enough of this off of MSM, we don’t need the school system doing that for us. The parents should be responsible for teaching their children morals.

    Forgive me if I’m wrong but when I was in school it was about the 3 R’s. Not all of the socially acceptable B***S*** that is going on now.

    As Michelle says “No Wonder Johnny Can’t Read”.

  6. ragnarok says:

    ag2828 said:

    “And anyone who can’t see the connection between bettering the lives of working Americans and education…well, they need to be educated.”

    No question that a good education is a big help in improving your life, but then the question is, why is the NEA being obstructionist?

  7. “Late” is correct.

  8. SuperSub says:

    The NEA cares more about the Liberal agenda rather than the welfare of its members and the children they educate. If teachers were allowed to opt out of the NEA, you’d soon see it either die off or actually change for the better.

  9. Maybe the leadership of the NEA doesn’t want to draw too much attention to the second word in the organization’s name and, to divert attention from that word, is espousing just about everything but quality in public education.

    I can understand their dilemma. With the word “teacher” in the title of the organization there might be some confusion on the part of the public. Some naive people might come to the conclusion that the organization has something to do with teaching. There might be some confusion about the organization’s goals and responsibilities.

    A certain level of confusion is worth cultivating. There’s value in being assumed to be an authority but if you in fact, are, an authority then there’s a tendency to hold you accountable for the results of the exercise of your expertise.

    Can’t have that so the NEA walks a tightrope between implying that they have an organizational interest in promoting good teaching practices and making no distinction between good and bad teachers.

    ag2828 wrote:

    I’m glad the NEA opposes Wal-Mart.

    Well sure. Who else is going to right society’s wrongs but the noble teacher? And what better organization to champion that wrong righting then the NEA? Exemplifying, as it does, the nobility of the American labor movement.

    Certainly developing knowledge aquisition strategies and inculcating a scientific way of knowing is important and all that but there are rain forests to save. There are factories in third world nations where people are happy to just have a job and don’t understand about air and water pollution, species depletion and the social safety net. Who’s going to school the Red-state, Jerry Springer-watchers on the importance of all these issues but the teacher?

    By the way ag2828, “Nickled and Dimed” isn’t about the “working poor”. It’s about a liberal princess who’s under the impression that truth is manufactured out of intentions. It’s about a liberal princess who despises and demeans the people she purports to care about. It’s a book in which the author announces her agenda and then announces that she’s not all that interested in journalism but is determinedly interested in advancing her agenda.

    People who bought “Nickled and Dimed” also bought “Fast Food Nation” and “Stupid White Men”.

  10. nailsagainsttheboard says:

    One more time…
    We can always count on the NEA and other Leftist entities to espouse racial and ethnic ‘diversity’ but squelch any diversity of so-called ‘conservative’ ideas, especially if it diverges from their World View. Political correctness has shoved the Dems firmly into the radical Left-yesterday’s classical liberal is today’s conservative, and nowhere is the shift more evident than in public education. The NEA’s obsession with Leftist politics rather than pedagogy is truly a weapon of mass distraction…distraction from wasting billions of tax $$$$ since the Great Society began on public education. Title I, ‘Bilingual’ (translation: Monolingual Spanish) education, faux ‘reforms’ (ie. constructivism, integrated math, whole language, educating millions of illegal aliens, ad nauseum). Indeed Johnny can’t read, write or do math…why bother, when Uncle Sam will take care of all your needs.

  11. Roger Sweeny says:

    Joanne,

    Looking at the NEA website, I don’t think the items are numbered in order of importance. It looks like that’s just the order they were considered at the convention (I don’t know if anyone decides an order or whether it’s random or “first submitted, first considered” or what).

    Did the people who voted for both #70 (debt forgiveness for foreign countries) and #67 (don’t buy from foreign countries) think that there might be some, um, difficulty there? “Pedro will never get a job in any business I patronize, but if his government wants to default on its debt, I’ll support it.”

  12. Walter E. Wallis says:

    The biggest fear of the NEA is that their ability to force people into unions, and then their ability to illegally use their extorted dues to advance democrat candidates and policies with those dues, will be stopped. Prove me wrong. Have the guts of John L. Lewis to go to voluntary membership.

  13. The leftist is a creature that seeks to politicize and wrap its tentacles around everything. In an earlier era it was called a Marxist-Leninist. Then it morphed into a Stalinist. Later it became a Maoist. Now it calls itself a neo-Marxist or a progressive and uses as its base seemingly benign institutions such as the NEA.

    Some progressives! Here’s a quote from Robert Anton Wilson:

    “All leftists … are reactionaries, yearning for the Oriental despotisms of pre-Hellenic times, the neolithic culture that preceded the rise of self-consciousness and egoism.”

  14. argumentum ad hominem
    argumentum ad hominem
    and
    argumentum ad hominem

  15. Mike in Texas says:

    Here in Texas, where the education community is struggling against the Republican effort to destroy public education, the approaches to the crisis has been completely different for each union. While I receive daily emails regarding impt. bills and amendments from the Texas Federation of Teachers, there has been almost nothing from the ATPE, the Texas NEA version. TFT also organzied teacher protests in the state capitol.

    Come the fall I will definately be changing my union affiliation to TFT. They even update their website more often than the once a month the ATPE does.

  16. BadaBing says:

    ag2828 does make a good point about the Wal-Mart concentration camps, where people are abducted and forced to work against their will. Why can’t Big Brother force a wage increase to, say, $75,000/year with full benefits and 90% retirement? As for Michelle Malkin, I’d say her husband is one lucky SOB, but I digress. Mayhaps ag2828 doesn’t know that many Japanese-Americans of that era were actually in the reserves of the Japanese Imperial Army. A couple of them living on my dad’s street left the country before WWII so they could join the fight against China. With the very real fear of Japanese-American collusion in an attack upon the Pacific Coast, and with the eye-opening Japanese-American support of a downed Imperial Navy pilot on Niihau Island, I have no problem with Japanese having been put in internment camps. But, then again, I don’t think it fair or logical to judge 1941 America, the America that kicked Nazi ass and put a stop to Japanese imperialism, according to present-day multicultural fuzzy-headed, touchy-feely, feminized, elitist standards.

  17. It looks like that’s just the order they were considered at the convention (I don’t know if anyone decides an order or whether it’s random or “first submitted, first considered” or what).

  18. Mike in Texas wrote:

    Here in Texas, where the education community is struggling against the Republican effort to destroy public education,

    And not getting much help from the public, either since that’s the majority Republican party that’s trying to destroy public education.

    Maybe the “education community” isn’t all that good at teaching the public the importance of public education.

    Or maybe the education community has done a really fine job of teaching the public the importance of public education and the public, having taken the lesson to heart, elected a Republican majority.

  19. It’s heartening to see that one of you guys has finally stood up and defended forced racial internment and low-paying jobs. And I particularly like the comparison of such practices to winning WWII! Now that’s creative.

  20. ag2828 wrote:

    It’s heartening to see that one of you guys has finally stood up and defended forced racial internment and low-paying jobs.

    If it was race-based internment then why weren’t Americans of Chinese extraction interned? Oh, and while you’re flinging charges of racism at U.S. policy be sure to include Canada. They had an internment/relocation policy as well. And Americans of German and Italian descent were also interned. Is it still race-based?

    As far as Walmart goes, no one’s forced to work there and no one’s forced to shop there. You could post a link to some credible source that details Walmart’s payroll levels. That would go a lot farther in the way of making your case then simply making the claim.

    And I particularly like the comparison of such practices to winning WWII! Now that’s creative.

    And I particularly like the casual dismissal of the milieu in which the internments occurred.

  21. Mike in Texas says:

    And not getting much help from the public, either since that’s the majority Republican party that’s trying to destroy public education.

    That will change when the public realizes the property tax reductions the Republicans are trying to ram through will be paid for by 80% of the population paying the highest state sales tax in the country, not to mention increased fees for auto registration and more taxes on previously non-taxed services.

    And you thought Republicans were against tax increases. They’re not; onless its an increase upon themselves and their rich friends. Soaking the rest of us is OK.

    Who else is going to right society’s wrongs but the noble teacher?

    hmm, seems there are studies to show teachers are the most respected profession in this country. Or at least they’re much higher rated than politicians and lawyers.

    A store that pays its employees so poorly they can’t afford health insurance, that they need to apply for food stamps, that they need to be placed on Medicaid, that they need to live in vans.

    I read a study recently, don’t have the link, that made the claim each Wal-Mart family cost the local taxpayers over $2K a year in social services for the poor.

  22. Mike in Texas says:

    And not getting much help from the public, either since that’s the majority Republican party that’s trying to destroy public education.

    That will change when the public realizes the property tax reductions the Republicans are trying to ram through will be paid for by 80% of the population paying the highest state sales tax in the country, not to mention increased fees for auto registration and more taxes on previously non-taxed services.

    And you thought Republicans were against tax increases. They’re not; onless its an increase upon themselves and their rich friends. Soaking the rest of us is OK.

    Who else is going to right society’s wrongs but the noble teacher?

    hmm, seems there are studies to show teachers are the most respected profession in this country. Or at least they’re much higher rated than politicians and lawyers.

    A store that pays its employees so poorly they can’t afford health insurance, that they need to apply for food stamps, that they need to be placed on Medicaid, that they need to live in vans.

    I read a study recently, don’t have the link, that made the claim each Wal-Mart family cost the local taxpayers over $2K a year in social services for the poor.

  23. Mike in Texas says:

    And not getting much help from the public, either since that’s the majority Republican party that’s trying to destroy public education.

    That will change when the public realizes the property tax reductions the Republicans are trying to ram through will be paid for by 80% of the population paying the highest state sales tax in the country, not to mention increased fees for auto registration and more taxes on previously non-taxed services.

    And you thought Republicans were against tax increases. They’re not; onless its an increase upon themselves and their rich friends. Soaking the rest of us is OK.

    Who else is going to right society’s wrongs but the noble teacher?

    hmm, seems there are studies to show teachers are the most respected profession in this country. Or at least they’re much higher rated than politicians and lawyers.

    A store that pays its employees so poorly they can’t afford health insurance, that they need to apply for food stamps, that they need to be placed on Medicaid, that they need to live in vans.

    I read a study recently, don’t have the link, that made the claim each Wal-Mart family cost the local taxpayers over $2K a year in social services for the poor.

  24. Mike in Texas says:

    And not getting much help from the public, either since that’s the majority Republican party that’s trying to destroy public education.

    That will change when the public realizes the property tax reductions the Republicans are trying to ram through will be paid for by 80% of the population paying the highest state sales tax in the country, not to mention increased fees for auto registration and more taxes on previously non-taxed services.

    And you thought Republicans were against tax increases. They’re not; onless its an increase upon themselves and their rich friends. Soaking the rest of us is OK.

    Who else is going to right society’s wrongs but the noble teacher?

    hmm, seems there are studies to show teachers are the most respected profession in this country. Or at least they’re much higher rated than politicians and lawyers.

    A store that pays its employees so poorly they can’t afford health insurance, that they need to apply for food stamps, that they need to be placed on Medicaid, that they need to live in vans.

    I read a study recently, don’t have the link, that made the claim each Wal-Mart family cost the local taxpayers over $2K a year in social services for the poor.

  25. Mike in Texas wrote:

    That will change when the public realizes the property tax reductions the Republicans are trying to ram through

    Oh sure. The Democrats, with their unblemished record of tax-cutting, will certainly benefit. A reputation earned over many a legislative session of careful penuriousness with the public purse will sweep them into office. Right.

    hmm, seems there are studies to show teachers are the most respected profession in this country.

    Cite?

    Or at least they’re much higher rated than politicians and lawyers.

    Now that’s a telling comparison!

    I read a study recently, don’t have the link, that made the claim each Wal-Mart family cost the local taxpayers over $2K a year in social services for the poor.

    Cite?

    Oh, and watch out for that server bug. You’ll think you haven’t posted at all when, in fact, you’ve posted twice, sometimes four times.

  26. ragnarok says:

    Mike,

    Ignoring for the moment the question of whether Walmart is a good corporate citizen or not, I’m quite intrigued by your claim that each Walmart family costs local taxpayers $2K per year.

    Is it your thesis that these employees could make more money elsewhere? If so, why are they at Walmart? Or that, barring Walmart, they’d be unemployed, costing taxpayers more than $2K per year, and that this would be a better scenario?

    You might also want to re-think your comment about the unfairness of the property-tax reduction. Consider: taxes in the U.S. are progressive.

  27. Here’s a Berkely Labor Center study estimating that, between food stamps, medical care, and other government services, taxpayers are subsidizing Walmart employees 86 million bucks a year. That’s just in California.

    I’d appreciate it if someone could tell me how to format a link, but till then I apologize.

    Why shouldn’t Walmart stockholders relieve the public of this burden? How on earth is someone making 14,000 bucks a year supposed to live, AND pay 1,000 for health insurance?

    http://laborcenter.berkeley.edu/lowwage/walmart.pdf

  28. Here ya go.

    (less then symbol)letterA href=”http://laborcenter.berkeley.edu/lowwage/walmart.pdf”(greater then symbol)clicky(less then symbol)slash letterA (greater then symbol)

    clicky

    Looks like pretty standard left-wing boilerplate.

    Problems created by left-wing solutions can only be remedied by more left-wing solutions. The engineering term for that is “positive feedback loop”.

    In case you missed it due to Mike’s multiple posts, the internment camps didn’t include Americans of Chinese descent which argues against your conclusion that the internment was race-based and Americans of German and Italian descent were also interned which also argues against your conclusion. The relocation of Japanese-Americans was limited to those living in areas near the Pacific ocean. Japanese-Americans living in less sensitive areas were not relocated.

    Also, Canada saw fit to intern their citizens of Japanese descent. Another racist nation?

  29. Actually, I borrowed this term from Ms. Malkin, whose book is entitled something like “In Defense of Internment: The Case for RACIAL Profiling” That’s not exact, I know, but what I remember.

    I fail to see why excluding those of Chinese descent, east coast Japanese, or Canada’s actions justifies internment based on national origin. This is obfuscation rather than argument.

    There are those who say discrimination against Jews is not anti-Semitism, because there are other Semetic people, and not all Jews are necessarily Semetic. To me, it appears a semantic argument, and whatever you call it, and whoever does it, I can’t see the justification.

    “Left-wing boilerplate” is insubstantial ad-hominem, and you’re perfectly capable of constructing arguments without stuff like that. I could call virtually all your arguments “right-wing boilerplate” and it would be equally meaningless.

    I’m good friends with several right-wing history teachers, and while we disagree utterly, we treat one another with respect. They’re very smart (though misguided, IMHO), and I’d be happy to have one of them teach my daughter.

  30. ag2828 wrote:

    Actually, I borrowed this term from Ms. Malkin, whose book is entitled something like “In Defense of Internment: The Case for RACIAL Profiling” That’s not exact, I know, but what I remember.

    Oh, well, you borrowed it. I guess that absolves you of any responsibility to offer substantiation. It’s Ms. Malkin’s book title so there you are. So glad you made that clear.

    I fail to see why excluding those of Chinese descent, east coast Japanese, or Canada’s actions justifies internment based on national origin.

    It’s the fault of liberal eye-sight. You see what you want to see and what’s convenient to see.

    Let me help you out.

    The liberal myth about the Japanese-American internment is that it was racist in nature, unnecessary and exclusive to the U.S.

    If it was racist in nature then Americans of Chinese extraction would have been rounded up as well, being oriental. They weren’t. Further, Americans of German and Italian extraction were interned. Germans and Italians, it should be noted, are not oriental. This suggests strongly that the internments were based on political considerations, not racial differences.

    Another part of the myth of Japanese-American internment was that it was not necessary.

    Necessity may be in the eye of the beholder but thousands of Japanese immigrants as well as second-generation American citizens of Japanese descent were subscribers to Japanese publications that were openly supportive of Japan’s wars of aggression against its neighbors. The Japanese government encouraged and supported organizations similar to the German-supported bunds.

    It didn’t take a great deal of imagination to see the utility of such organizations in the run-up to a war between the U.S. and Japan. They were useful fronts for the recruitment of espionage and sabotage agents as well as a network of sympathizers who would support Japan in less direct, but still damaging, ways.

    Finally, the charge is made that the U.S. was alone in among the democracies in its policy of internment, by way of showing the exceptional nature of American racism. Canada’s choice to intern Canadian citizens of Japanese descent undercuts the notion of American exceptionalism in this regard. At the time, the notion of moving citizens of doubtful loyalty away from areas where they could communicate with and support their homeland was just a pretty good idea and that wasn’t a point of view held exclusively by the U.S.

    They’re very smart (though misguided, IMHO), and I’d be happy to have one of them teach my daughter.

    And that’s not a view held by many who call themselves as progressive, preferring as they do to categorize anyone who they label as conservative into one of three bins: stupid, crazy or evil. Sometimes into all three bins.

    I’d get into why my dismissal of your link doesn’t qualify as an ad-hominem attack but this post is getting long enough already and it’s a bit off-topic.

    By the way, did my instructions for inserting a link come across? The limitations of this forum make getting that sort of information across kind of tricky. If I post a link, that tells you nothing about how to post a link and it only shows up as a link. The info’s at the blog provider but finding it is a PIA.

  31. Roger Sweeny says:

    ag2828,

    I was thinking about that study and it occurred to me that maybe you’re the one costing the state all that money. See, if you employed them instead of Wal-Mart and paid them enough so they didn’t qualify for all that assistance, you would save the state 86 million dollars.

    In fact, we’re all at fault because none of us are employing them for higher wages. (In fact, we’re not employing them at all. At least, Wal-Mart’s doing that.) Hey, maybe that’s why we all pay for their assistance–in the form of general taxes.

    If we think they deserve more, we can pay them directly (gift, charity, employment), or indirectly through the government. Why should Wal-Mart shareholders and consumers be the only ones to do that? It’s not like it’s even going to be a good “soak the rich” thing. Some of the extra wages are going to come from higher prices and Wal-Mart’s customers tend to be on the lower end of the income scale.

  32. Well, Roger, if you think that’s a good idea, you go ahead and do that.

  33. BadaBing says:

    Roger:

    I don’t think he’ll get it, and if he does, it won’t matter to him. When “progressives” target an entity, it don’t matter the consequences. Take, for example, Uncle Rob’s punitive legislation against cigarettes. (It was ostensibly done for the sake of the children. Another slimey little liberal trick that we won’t get into here). But those that really suffer are lower-income folk that make up the bulk of the cigarette market.

    As long as we’re throwing another punch at “Big Tobacco” and doing it for “the children,” who gives a rip about those lower-income smokers? They shouldn’t be smoking anyway, right? So, there.

  34. ragnarok says:

    About how Wal-Mart underpays its workers, I have a suggestion. It doesn’t require any new taxes, it doesn’t cost Wal-Mart a penny, nor does it cost the teachers a thing.

    In California, the teachers’ union pull in about $250M per year (335,000 members at $800 each). I think almost anyone would agree that the union doesn’t need that kind of money, so substituting for the state and paying the $86M to the Wal-Mart workers should be a snap. That would still leave the CTA with well over $150M.

    Comments?

  35. Boy, those liberals. First, they complain about forced internment. Then, they complain about low wages.

    And now, SMOKING!

    How do they sleep at night?

  36. Hanging from the rafters by their clawed feet like any self-respecting vampire.

  37. Roger Sweeny says:

    ag2828,

    If I were a resident of California, I might well vote to tax myself to support low-income workers.

    What struck me about your post was that even though you felt it was terrible how little Wal-Mart workers were being paid, you were not willing to put out anything yourself. Instead, you wanted someone else to give them more. This struck me as somewhat selfish.

    Though you phrased your suggestion as “Wal-Mart shareholders” should pay the workers more, we all know that any legal requirment of higher wages would partially come out of higher prices. Since Wal-Mart shoppers are often low-income people, this means that your suggestion would hurt them. Since you obviously care about low-income people, I thought that was something you should consider.

  38. Actually, Roger, I recognized your comment for what it was and treated it accordingly. I support Walmart workers by contributing to organizations that will help them unionize, thuse giving them higher salaries and real benefits. That’s why I applaud the NEA’s efforts on their behalf.

    Here’s a comment I missed yesterday:

    “…that’s not a view held by many who call themselves as progressive, preferring as they do to categorize anyone who they label as conservative into one of three bins: stupid, crazy or evil. Sometimes into all three bins…”

    I like the way this writer condemns progressives for their use of witless, simplistic stereotypes. It’s ironic that he accomplishes this through a witless, simplistic stereotype of his own.

  39. ragnarok says:

    The NEA is a bad joke. When the vast majority of its top agenda items have nothing to do with education, when it protects deadwood, when it rails against standardised testing, when it embraces the massacre of math and English grammar, it’s a bad joke.

    It’s quite shameless for the NEA to try to shift attention away from its glaring failures in education by talking about Wal-Mart.

  40. Roberts says:

    Its amusing that ag2828 knows the name of the ad hominem logical fallacy … as he employs it so much.

    Now, its time to teach him the meaning of “irony”.

  41. Mike in Texas says:

    Allen wrote:

    And not getting much help from the public, either since that’s the majority Republican party that’s trying to destroy public education.

    From reading some Texas newspapers the general public is just ecstatic over the fact 80% of them will be paying higher taxes so that the 20% can get a tax break.

    Ragnorak wrote:
    You might also want to re-think your comment about the unfairness of the property-tax reduction

    So what is a fair way to fund education? I hardly think its fair the way Texas does it, often called the Robin Hood system, whereby rich school districts are forced to turn over tax revenue to the state to pay for schools in poor school districts. At the same time the state has drastically reduced the amount of funding it provides to education.

    How would YOU do it?

  42. I appreciate your point here, but let’s be honest: the vast majority of Wal-Mart shoppers are not poor people; they are middle class people who just buy way too much shit*.

    *I don’t shop at Wal-Mart these days, but I am also a middle class person who buys way too much shit, as evidenced by the massive cleaning out I am doing right now for the parish yard sale. Where did I get all this crap?? Who needs 35 coffee mugs??

  43. Roger Sweeny says:

    RCC,

    I suspect that if you compared the average income of people who shop at Wal-Mart, Target, Sears, the Gap, etc., Wal-Mart would come out at the bottom.

    I suppose you could say they all cater to middle class people who buy way too much …

  44. ragnarok says:

    Mike,

    A link to an explanation of how 80% of Texans will be paying higher taxes in order to reduce taxes on the other 20% would be good.

  45. ag2828 wrote:

    I like the way this writer condemns progressives for their use of witless, simplistic stereotypes. It’s ironic that he accomplishes this through a witless, simplistic stereotype of his own.

    Don’t you just love it? Isn’t the irony simply delicious?

    In the mean time, the NCLB is the law of the land and despite Mike in Texas’ repeated promises to provide evidence of a nation-wide grassroots campaign to repeal the NCLB, most school districts and most states aren’t even bothering to whimper. They just wuvs those federal dollars too much to even think about endangering them.

    Then there’s charters – 40 states worth and a fight to raise caps in every one of those states.

    And vouchers. And payroll protection laws. And tax credits.

    You enjoy your irony. I’ll enjoy everything else.