A really big show

At some high schools, the school play has turned into an extravaganza, the New York Times reports. The story focuses on New Albany High in southern Indiana.

With all the auto shops, fast-food joints and boarded-up houses in the vicinity, it is somewhat disorienting to find Mr. Longest operating out of a $17 million performing arts annex, part of a recently completed $50 million renovation of New Albany High School that was financed by property taxes. With its airy glass lobbies and soaring curved roofs, its 24-hour radio station, television broadcast center, huge indoor pool and student bank, the building could be mistaken for the centerpiece of a college campus. But it’s a public school. Despite local poverty (one-third of New Albany’s 2,000 students are eligible for free or reduced-cost lunches), residents rejected a tax cut – by a ratio of eight to one – in order to pay for the improvements. Steve Sipes, the principal, said they had done so because the arts at New Albany had over the years brought a measure of pride, comparable only to that generated by the sports teams, to a city that’s seen better days.

I see on Great Schools that New Albany High ranks below neighboring high schools in English and math scores, and below the state average.

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Comments

  1. Ross the Heartless Conservative says:

    I see on Great Schools that New Albany High ranks below neighboring high schools in English and math scores, and below the state average.

    Yeah, but which would you prefer a school that looks great and helps the community feel better or one that actually get results.

  2. BadaBing says:

    When all else fails, get out the finger paints.