School blogs

Classroom blogs are growing in popularity, says Teacher Magazine (free registration required). Some kids who hate to write with pencil and paper love to blog.

Patrick Delaney, a school librarian and coordinator of the San Francisco-based Educational Bloggers Network, estimates that some 1,000 teachers from kindergarten through high school have established blogs, which he calls “digital paper,” for their classrooms. . . Advocates of in-class curricular blogging say its rising popularity speaks to its ability to let students help teach each other. “If students are writing for an audience other than their teacher, it brings them out and makes them more thoughtful,” (teacher) Zelkha (Sarvenaz) says. “Blogging raises the standard of the whole room.”

It’s nice to see teachers worry that blogging, because it’s so informal, doesn’t teach writing conventions. Perhaps writing conventions are coming back into fashion.

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Comments

  1. “It’s nice to see teachers worry that blogging, because it’s so informal, doesn’t teach writing conventions.”

    I know, I know, it’d be way to obvious to say that the medium doesn’t teach writing skills, the teacher does. So here goes…

    The medium doesn’t teach writing skills, the teacher does.

  2. Direct instruction of writing conventions has value, but for the most part, students improve their writing by doing a great deal of it, even if the writing is informal.

    I could tell you that I speak from 30 years of teaching experience, but I’m sure you’d find a lot more 30 year veterans who disagree.

    But ook how much better Joanne has been writing since she’s taken up blogging!

    And please do not forget my blog. robertwright.islonely.com