Colorado charter highs

Charter schools outperform non-charters in Colorado, reports the Denver Post.

Forty-six percent of Colorado’s charter school programs were rated “excellent” or “high” on the state’s School Accountability Reports this year, compared with 39.6 percent of traditional public schools, a Denver Post analysis of the accountability data found.

Colorado charters serve fewer students who qualify for free and reduced-price lunches, which is the traditional way of determining student poverty. Advocates say they’ve got just as many poor kids but many charters don’t serve lunch, so they don’t collect eligibility data.

Education Gadfly points out that “many of the Colorado charter schools have been around long enough to iron out some of the ‘start-up’ kinks that plague fledgling charters elsewhere.”

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Comments

  1. Mike in Texas says:

    Advocates say they’ve got just as many poor kids but many charters don’t serve lunch, so they don’t collect eligibility data.

    But are the public schools required to serve lunch in Colorado? Not requiring the charter schools to do it is another way to drive down costs, allowing them to claim they can do it cheaper.

  2. Since Colorado charter schools have to exist on less money then their district-based counterparts it seems reasonable to have them focus their efforts on their reason for existance – education.

    They’ve got a tough enough fight on their hands trying to educate the kids the district schools have messed up.

  3. ariztophanes says:

    If it’s like one of the schools here in Arizona, then the students buy their lunch from a local sub shop.

    Mike has a point: is it a way of driving down costs to have students buy their own lunches? Is it another way of making sure that the “really poor” or “really challenged” kids DON’T stay in charter schools? I’m interested to hear from the charter advocates on this one. I’m sure the argument would be that there’s nothing wrong with requiring parents to pony up a few bucks every week, but I think it’s that kind of argument that leads the public schools to level the charges of cherry picking.

    Heck, I wouldn’t mind if the public schools did the same. We weren’t well-off, but my mom was able to send a lunch with ME every day. How expensive IS a loaf of bread and some bologna? A jar of mayonnaise lasts a long time! Apples and oranges don’t cost THAT much. Maybe the responsibility might require that irresponsible parents change their ways or be exposed as the louts they are.

    Perhaps it’s time to let public schools claim the same benefit, telling parents that it’s THEIR responsibility to feed THEIR kids.

  4. Mike in Texas says:

    Since Colorado charter schools have to exist on less money then their district-based counterparts it seems reasonable to have them focus their efforts on their reason for existance – education.

    I’ll take that to mean, yes, Colorado charter schools are not required to provide kids with lunch. Just another tactic of the pro charter crowd, saddle the public schools with all kinds of expensive rules, make the charters exempt from them, and then crow about how cheaply they can educate kids.