Children of the fallen

Nearly 900 U.S. children lost a parent in the war in Iraq by the end of November, estimates Scripps Howard.

Overall, Americans in uniform today are far more likely to be married and have children than in the military of the past, (Professor Charles) Moskos and others said. And the reliance in Iraq on reserve forces — who tend to be older and even more settled than active-duty soldiers — also means more offspring at home.

. . . According to the Scripps research, more than 40 percent of the 1,256 war dead through November were married, and 429 had children. At least half of those youngsters were 10 years old or younger. Among the parents who died were six women soldiers who had borne a total of 10 children among them — another historic first for females in the U.S. military.

More than 40 men died without ever seeing their children.

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Comments

  1. “More than 40 men died without ever seeing their children.”

    And they didnt’ have to die. This war didn’t have to happen. There were no WMD. Saddam wasn’t the only problem.

    I see these yellow ribbon decals on the back of SUV’s. Walgreens sells them for $4.00. How many more men are going to die without ever seeing their children?

    The best way to support our troops, under the circumstances, is to encourage them not to enlist in the first place. And those who made the mistake, they should desert.

    See how to “Adopt A Deserter” at desertion.ispopular.com.

    The war is wrong.

  2. Doug Sundseth says:

    Rather than recapitulate a debate that has run for long enough that we’ve all heard the arguments, I’ll just say that I disagree categorically. I disagree with your conclusions and disagree with each of the pieces of “evidence” that you adduce to support them. I disagree with your suggested courses of action in every case.

    On the other hand, thanks for letting me know where I can find the stickers. I’ve been wondering where I could buy one.

    Merry Euphemism and a Happy Arbitrary Time Period.

  3. Richard Nieporent says:

    I agree with you completely Doug. I would rather we would not debate this issue on this website. However, I do have one comment for Robert. You wrote:

    The best way to support our troops, under the circumstances, is to encourage them not to enlist in the first place. And those who made the mistake, they should desert

    The keyword here is enlist. Nobody is forcing anybody to join the military. As hard as it may be for you to believe, some of our troops may actually believe in what they are doing. The fact that you disagree with their decision does not make it wrong. What is wrong is for anyone to encourage desertion. Shame on you for doing so.

  4. “As hard as it may be for you to believe, some of our troops may actually believe in what they are doing.”

    I’m sure most of them believe in what they are doing.

    “The fact that you disagree with their decision does not make it wrong.”

    Yes, you’re right. Perhaps I should preface my statements with “in my humble opinion.”

    The deaths of these parents is sad, and all the more sad because, in my humble opinion, the war was not necessary.

    It’s always easier to tell children that their fathers died for a good cause rather than they were duped and died in vain.

    But if you avoid the unpleasant truth, you continue to justify a war that was and continues to be, in my humble opinion, a huge mistake.

    When the war is not just, desertion can be an honorable course of action.

    Camilo Mejias is serving a one year sentence for desertion and, in my humble opinion, he serves with honor.

  5. Richard Nieporent says:

    When the war is not just, desertion can be an honorable course of action.

    That is very easy for you to say because you don’t have to suffer the consequences. It doesn’t take very much courage to advocate that someone else go to jail for your convictions. If you really feel so strongly about this, why don’t you commit an act of civil disobedience that will put you in jeopardy of the law?

  6. Richard, you’re right. It’s easy for me to say what I say and it takes no courage.

  7. ariztophanes says:

    Desertion.ispopular.com?

    When -I- visited it had a hit count of 42. I think photos.of.my.hemorrhoids.com has more hits than THAT!

    Honestly, as someone who joined the Army willingly, I CAN say that going to war is part of the risk. You can’t just take the paycheck until the going gets rough.

    Geez, next thing you know some IDIOT will be arguing that they didn’t understand the contract to join the (we carry guns, practice bayonetting enemies, and patching up sucking chest wounds) military. I know SOME think the military is just another social welfare proposal, but it’s still VOLUNTARY. Regardless of the dimwits who claim to be “conscientious objectors” after the fact, it’s about violence and war — the same war that protects their pansy lifestyle.

    Every one of these men (and women) who have died should be mourned, or course, but ultimately PRAISED as the warriors who defend our way of life against the enemies that we would soon have to fight if they were not on duty. I hope it’s in that spirit that this original posting was meant. However, excessive mourning implies that there is no PRAISE to be given, and it’s THAT INSINUATION that insults those of us who have served. It’s as if the words DUTY and SACRIFICE have lost their meaning. Woe to us all if they have!

    Praise those soldiers who have paid the ultimate sacrifice as the HEROES they are, and praise their families and their children for the hurt they have endured. We are humbled by their sacrifice for us, and reminded just how serious this business of defending civilization is. I, for one, think it’s worth fighting for.

  8. In my humble opinion, there is a big difference between people who enlisted into the Army, or Marines and those who signed up as weekenders in the National Guard. To me, there’s a big difference between young men signing up to be Rangers, or Navy Seals and 50 year old high school principals and real estate agents called over as reservists. I understand that people sign up voluntarily, and understand there are risks involved. That doesn’t mean their lives are to be needlessly wasted in a mindless profiteering scheme by the neo-cons.

    –Cobra

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