Charter jocks

I’ve never thought of charter schools as football powerhouses, but two of five Heisman Trophy finalists were teammates at Helix Charter High School in La Mesa, California. Of course, that USC guy won.

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Comments

  1. This ought to help energize the push for charters in Texas if what I’ve heard about Texas’ fondness for football is true.

  2. superdestroyer says:

    The Eligibility rules in Texas would prevent it. If you transfer during High School a student loses a year of varsity eligibility in Texas. The rules are to prevent rich schools from recruiting the students of poor schools.

    In the early 1980’s, some inner city Texas high schools tried to use magnet programs as a way to “stack” a team at certain schools. Houston Yates in the early 1980’s being the best example. The rules prevent it now.

  3. Mike in Texas says:

    But you can always transfer to a charter school and as long as your school doesn’t play any public schools you won’t have to bother with any of those pesky academic rules like having to pass a test to graduate or to move on to another grade.

  4. Now would those be the public schools that spend such outrageous amounts of money on sports stadiums and sports programs?

    It’s great to know that, even though the public schools spend all that money on sports programs, and that the sports programs have such a high profile in the community, there’s an unbending adherence to “those pesky academic rules”.

    Hey, I believe it. Really. I do.

  5. Mike in Texas says:

    Ahh but Allen, you misunderstand the importance of football. If a kid is a superstar schools, both public and charter, will come knocking down his door to get him to transfer. Charter schools have an advantage in that those “pesky academic rules” don’t apply to them and that can be a major selling point. But let’s be realistic; if the kid is a superstar not many of the rules will apply to him anyway. Case in point; several years ago a local high school powerhouse had a star athlete viciously assault another student at school. Surpisingly enough he was actually convicted in served 3 months in jail and returned just in time for football season. Since he had “paid his debt” he was allowed back into school and back on the football team. Several weeks later he was arrested for armed robbery, but horror of horrors, the police arrested him at football practice (they later stated it was b/c they knew he would be there but the local media insisted it was a case of racism). I believe some police officers were actually disciplined for the lack of respect to the local football scene.

  6. Mike in Texas wrote:

    Charter schools have an advantage in that those “pesky academic rules” don’t apply to them and that can be a major selling point.

    As it should be.

    You may feel you have the right to impose your decisions and values on other people’s children but I don’t.

    Of course, you’re a teacher so imposing your values on other people’s children is part of your job description. Too bad.

    But let’s be realistic; if the kid is a superstar not many of the rules will apply to him anyway.

    As I recall, it was you who tried to draw a distinctionless difference between charters and district-based schools. Nice to see you don’t cling doggedly to a self-evidently ridiculous position.

    With regard to Texans fondness for football, my advice is that you get used to it.

    Not only is that love affair not on the wane but, and here’s where we’ll part company, you’re wrong. Not because I think football is more important then academics. I think you’re wrong because you are the wrong person to make that sort of choice for anyone’s children other then your own.

  7. Mike in Texas says:

    you are the wrong person to make that sort of choice for anyone’s children other then your own.

    But yet you seem to think Dubaya and Rod Paige are. I would rather throw teacher’s names into a hat and draw one out at random then let either one of them decides what’s best for my child or my students.

    As for football, I actually enjoy it. I’m just pointing out that many school districts will and have cut funding to academic programs while safeguarding athletic funding. While I’m sure they are beneficial to the students involved in them the academic programs that are sacrificed effect far more students than benefit from having a football team.

    Nice to see you don’t cling doggedly to a self-evidently ridiculous position.

    You are the only one who thinks its ridiculous or distinctionless.

  8. superdestroyer says:

    Mike,

    In most states but not in Texas, it is the private schools that recruit the best students and they generally recruit from the public schools. Remember, Gerry Faust who coached at Moeller High in Cincinnati and tried to coach at Notre Dame. He was able to recruit the best athletes from the greater Cincinnati area and was used to running a “vanilla” powerplay offense because he had bigger, stronger players.

    As far as cheating in Texas, read the book “Friday Night Lights,” part of the book documents the cheating at all black Dallas Carter High School and how the school was stripped of its state championship.

  9. Mike in Texas says:

    Superdestroyer,

    I’m not terribly versed on Texas high school football. What I understand about “Friday Night Lights” (at least the movie) is that its a “sorta” based on a true story, with many of the facts changed to make a better story.

  10. Mike in Texas wrote:

    But yet you seem to think Dubaya and Rod Paige are.

    Is that what I think? Had your turban with the big jewel in the front on when you divined that truth? Guess again Carnak.

    I’ve made it real clear what I think.

    Anything that reduces the authority of parents is wrong. That’s what I think. Now you don’t have to guess.

    I would rather throw teacher’s names into a hat and draw one out at random then let either one of them decides what’s best for my child or my students.

    I’m with you Mike up until this part of the last sentence “or my students”. Do you actually expect anyone to believe that you’d draw no distinction between “my child” and “my students”?

    Of course, you expect that. Parents want to believe that you’d care for their children with the same responsibility and concern as they would. They’d rather not give any consideration to the fact that what you do is called “employment” and some people are good at it and some people dreadful. No, parents want to believe that they are doing what’s right for their kids, putting them in the hands of committed, capable professionals who’ll see that they are protected and educated.

    The truth, of course, is somewhat different.

    I’m just pointing out that many school districts will and have cut funding to academic programs while safeguarding athletic funding.

    And I’m pointing out that that sort of decision ought to be left up to the parents explicitly. It’s already is left up to the parents implicitly because any attempt to cut the sports programs generates all sorts of parental resistance.

    Why not have a Dallas Football Charter Academy where the kids are instructed in the finer points of the use of anabolic steroids and a Dallas Future Nobel Prize Winners Academy right down the street?

    I couldn’t care less about football but I’m quite willing to believe that other people do and that some of those people might believe football is the route to success for their children. I also believe that the only people who have a credible claim on that right are those parents and not you.

  11. superdestroyer says:

    Allen,

    The problem with assuming that parents should rightly have full control, is that someday the minor becomes an adult. Why should the parents have 100% say over how the child will function as an adult?

    Haven’t you every watched the movei “Hoop Dreams”? It shows what happens when poor, uneducated parents decide that sports is the only path for their children and the children suffer immensely for it.

    Do you really want to live in the same town where a school graduate 100 steroided up athletes who are functionally illiterate?