Thank who

Maryland’s public school students learn about Thanksgiving without learning who the Pilgrims thanked: God is taboo in social studies class.

Young students across the state read stories about the Pilgrims and Native Americans, simulate Mayflower voyages, hold mock feasts and learn about the famous meal that temporarily allied two very different groups.

But what teachers don’t mention when they describe the feast is that the Pilgrims not only thanked the Native Americans for their peaceful three-day indulgence, but repeatedly thanked God.

“We teach about Thanksgiving from a purely historical perspective, not from a religious perspective,” said Charles Ridgell, St. Mary’s County Public Schools curriculum and instruction director.

Of course, the Pilgrims’ religious beliefs are part of U.S. history.

Mentioning that the Pilgrims were Puritan is about as close as most administrators are willing to step to integrate religion into their curriculums.

“We mention they were Puritan but students usually just understand that they had a belief system and not much more than that,” said Carol Williamson, Queen Anne’s County Schools’ associate superintendent.

So, students are left in ignorance.

Thanksgiving is usually taught as a part of social studies and emphasizes cultural immersion.

“The Pilgrim Story is read in Spanish and English,” said Alfreda Adams, principal at Mills-Parole Elementary School in Anne Arundel County where 70 Hispanic students attend. “We make sure that we celebrate all cultures.”

Really? Sure you’re not missing one?

Update: Scrappleface has more on Lucky Thursday in Maryland.

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Comments

  1. Richard Nieporent says:

    God is taboo in social studies class.

    However, all religion is not being excluded from the public schools. Environmentalism has become the official religion of the state and the students are being taught to worship Gaia.

  2. How on earth do they teach about the Inquisition, the Reformation, the Enlightenment, the English Civil War, all without mention of religion? Or maybe they never heard of any of these things?….

  3. Also…”students usually just understand that they had a belief system” is a completely null statement, inasmuch as *everyone* has a belief system.

  4. This will give them more time for ‘cultural studies‘.

  5. Come, come, come.

    The significance of the Pilgrims has very little to do with religion.

    Or, at least is has no more to do with religion than what happened to the flocks of Jim Jones and David Koresh. Like the Puritans, they were out of the mainstream and had to pack up and move because of it.

    It’s a good thing for the Pilgrims that they had the Indians around to make them less puritanical.

  6. Nice to know that the rewriting of history for the convenience of the politically correct isn’t limited to the history books.

    It’s also nice to know that those nutball Pilgrims bailed out of that exemplar of religious tolerance, 15th century England. And here I thought they’d left England because of brutal religious repression. Just goes to show ya, hey?

  7. Michelle Dulak Thomson says:

    Alle,

    To be fair, that would be 17th-century England. 15th-c. England was not a safe place to be if you were a Lollard, but there weren’t religious persecutions on anything like the scale of the next two centuries.

  8. Michelle Dulak Thomson says:

    allen, not “Alle.” Sheesh, Michelle, preview already.

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