Money in ivy

The president of Johns Hopkins University makes more money than the typical Baltimore resident — or the typical English professor. Cranky Professor makes fun of a Washington Post story on well-paid college presidents. Johns Hopkins’ chief is the top earner in 2003 with compensation of $897,786, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education. Top coaches make more than $1 million a year. Cranky Professor writes:

There are two amusing things in the article — first, the idea that there’s any relationship between the salary of the President of Johns Hopkins University and cash-strapped Baltimore. Tee hee! Second, the inevitable note that the coaches get paid more — a lot more. Well, they do more for the universities; fundraisers aren’t a dime a dozen, but you can obviously get one for a lot less than a first rate basketball coach.

Universities aren’t run by Professor Chips any more.

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Comments

  1. Mike in Texas says:

    fundraisers aren’t a dime a dozen, but you can obviously get one for a lot less than a first rate basketball coach.

    A first rate basketball coach contributes absolutely nothing to the academics of the university. In fact, you could cancel every atheletic team there is at most colleges and the academics would improve greatly.

  2. I find this more objectionable at public schools. If Johns Hopkins’ trustess wants to pay their president some lavish amount, that’s their business; OTOH, the fact that, for example the presidents of Florida’s public universities get paid multiple times in state taxpayer money what the Governor makes demands more accountability. As also surely does, Mike, the fact that the state’s best-paid public employees are the football coaches at FSU and UF.

  3. Richard Nieporent says:

    Of course it has nothing to do with academics, Mike. However, you seem to forget that a successful coach is able to generate a large amount of money for the school. That is why these coaches get such large pay packages.

    Dave, JHU has had a number of very successful fundraisers over the last few years. Since the major job of the college president is to raise funds for the university, it would appear he is worth the money he is paid.

  4. while there are also a few academic departments one could also cancel and improve overall academics, I disagree with the blanket statement that cancelling athletics is the way to nirvana. In fact, I would argue that would make less effective students/leaders/alumni (and not just in the “gather-round-the-stadium” groundswell.)

    Yes of course athletics can go overboard (and has) but sailing off to the other extreme is as flawed, William Bowen nothwithstanding.

  5. Mike in Texas says:

    Richard wrote:

    you seem to forget that a successful coach is able to generate a large amount of money for the school.

    Do you really believe that money finds its way back into the general operating funds of the university? It goes to support more athletic teams. These teams, while nice, benefit a very small percentage of people for the money put into them.

  6. Richard Nieporent says:

    Do you really believe that money finds its way back into the general operating funds of the university?

    Yes, I know it does. The athletic boosters tend to make large contributions to the school. Whether they would be as generous if the school didn’t have a winning team is problematical.

  7. On top of that, winning teams draw in students. More students bring more tuition.

    And many sports fans are desirable students. I was a good student and paid my tuition. I was even nominated (although not chosen) for an academic award. But, I would not have wanted to go to a school with pathetic athletics.

  8. Mike in Texas says:

    And many sports fans are desirable students. I was a good student and paid my tuition. I was even nominated (although not chosen) for an academic award. But, I would not have wanted to go to a school with pathetic athletics.

    You are probably an exception to the rule then. I’d love to see some statistics on kids who pick a school b/c of its athletic teams. I wonder how many of them graduate?

  9. John from OK says:

    I did. I chose UCLA when I was 17. I had no desire to attend Harvey Mudd, U. of Chicago, or any other college that sent me literature based on my SAT’s. I had never heard of them. I knew who the Ivy’s were, and who the Division 1 schools were.

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