No-shows

Schools are working harder to get truants back in school, reports the Christian Science Monitor.

Techniques vary from neighborhood sweeps in Houston to computerized recordkeeping in San Diego. Yet from school to school, one math equation remains the same – more students in class equal more dollars for the district. Where budgets are tight, schools are certain to boost cash flow by filling their empty seats.

Los Angeles Unified will spend as much as $500,000 on its new “Count Me In” campaign, reports the Monitor.

Using a carrot, in addition to the district attorney’s stick for chronic truants, Count Me In could mean students who improve attendance might meet L.A. Clippers players or visit the set of a movie.

I wonder what non-truants get.

Of course, just getting bodies in the building isn’t enough. It helps to persuade students it’s worth their time and effort to pursue an education. That’s a tough job, though.

Under NCLB, schools must test 95 percent of students, so there’s an incentive to get even troublesome students to show up. By high school, the incentive shifts: Transfer the unmotivated students to alternative schools, or let them drop out, and the scores will be higher.

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Comments

  1. Bluemount says:

    Under NCLB, schools must test 95 percent of students, so there’s an incentive to get even troublesome students to show up. By high school, the incentive shifts: Transfer the unmotivated students to alternative schools, or let them drop out, and the scores will be higher.
    In the view of parents, their children are railroaded into medication mills where they are sorted and their futures decided. The teachers from affluent classes view the parents with contempt. It’s no wonder home schooling is on the rise and a measurable part of the student population. After their children are therapuetically distroyed and not fit for work they are handed over to programs for adult supervision. If you have to sweep the streets because parents don’t like you maybe their some question about the value of the service.

  2. mike from oregon says:

    “Yet from school to school, one math equation remains the same – more students in class equal more dollars for the district.”

    Want a good example of that? My daughter caught pnuemonia and was out of school for a week. The school called 4 out of the 5 days, even though each time I told them what her problem was, that she wouldn’t be in school for the rest of that week; and each time the bozo on the other end assured me that it was being marked down on the charts and that I would not get a call the next day. Next day, another call, same stupid scenario.

    This school district lost over 1,000 kids between last year and this year. You bet they are looking for ANY way to bring more dollars into the schools.

  3. Left in Texas says:

    Truancy is one of the early warning signs of dropping out, so this seems like a pretty positive development to me.