No testing backlash

Public Agenda’s survey of teachers, parents and students, Reality Check 2002, finds widespread support for standards and testing.

Most students say they can handle the testing, and while a strong majority of teachers, parents, professors and employers say they’re worried about “teaching to the test,” only one-quarter of teachers say they’re actually doing it. All groups endorse standardized testing in some form, with one major caveat: majorities in all groups agree that a student’s graduation or promotion should not hang on one test. The groups surveyed report tangible change in other ways. Teachers report that summer school attendance is up, and social promotion is down.

However, the impact of higher academic standards has been mixed.

Few teachers report that schools have been either rewarded or sanctioned based on student performance. Employers and professors also continue to voice considerable dissatisfaction with high school graduates’ basic skills.

Check out Public Agenda’s fact file too.

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Comments

  1. What gets me is that this is considered such a “new” thing. I had to take standardized tests almost every year of school, from 3rd grade to 12th grade. This was in Georgia, Maryland, and North Carolina. Some of them were aptitude tests, but most were specific-subject achievement tests.

    Of course, they were in no way tied to teacher compensation. But my parents had the objective feedback almost every year.

  2. Sorry, I didn’t mention the time period – 80s through early 90s.

  3. Me, too, meep. And in Missouri, they actually called them what they were: the MMATs were the Missouri Mastery and Achievement tests. They happened every year from third through eighth grade.

  4. Mike in Texas says:

    This article is nothing but a recap of an earlier study Reality Check did that is nearly 3 years old, long before the implementation of NCLB. In other words, its out of date to what’s currently going on in American schools.

    Also, I can tell you the EDUCATION FACTS link contains info that is inaccurate. The starting salary for teachers in Texas is several thousand dollars lower than what is listed. Below is a link to the pay scale for a local school district that pays above state minimuns and you’ll see the starting salary listed is more than $2500 below what EDUCATION FACTS says.

    http://www.lufkinisd.org/pdf/empsalary.pdf

    Just b/c its on the Internet or in print doesn’t mean its true.

  5. I had standardized tests of some sort at least once in elementary school. Michigan in the 60’s.

  6. MiT wrote:
    “Below is a link to the pay scale for a local school district that pays above state minimuns and you’ll see the starting salary listed is more than $2500 below what EDUCATION FACTS says.”

    Interesting that he uses an internet reference to show that not everything on the internet is true…

  7. Mike in Texas says:

    Here is the phone number is you wish to verify, which I did.

    936/634-6696
    Of course, since I got the number off the Internet it might not be the real number hehe