Bill and the bloggers

On National Review Online, Matt Rosenberg of Rosenblog credits bloggers for keeping alive the story of Bill Cosby’s criticism of underclass black parenting styles. He analyzes the belated response by newspaper columnists to Cosby’s candor, singling out Gregory Clay’s column, which praises Cosby for “breaking the code” of silence. Clay, a Knight-Ridder News Service editor, wrote:

Cosby, in what appeared to be a veiled reference to the dangers of the hip-hop culture, moved on to poor English spoken by many black folk, saying some American-born black people are immigrants in their own country because of this.

He switched to the high prison rates among black males, admonishing black parents who don’t properly raise their children. Cosby presented scenarios of young black males dressed in orange jumpsuits in jails and courtrooms with their only salvation being their parents asking, “Jesus, please save my son.”

But Cosby used this forum to ask, “Where were the parents when he was 2 years old, when he was 12 years old, 18 years old?”

. . . The audience initially sat silently as people ostensibly were genuinely surprised by the direction of Cosby’s comments. But as Cosby got deeper into his sermon, he received intermittent amen-like applause. Suffice to say, Cosby woke up some folk.

Without bloggers, the story might have died quickly, Rosenberg writes.

I now have 108 comments on my Cosby post, and they’re still coming in. I’m pretty sure that’s a record.

Cathy Seipp was criticized for organizing a bloggers’ panel that didn’t include left-wing, lesbian, academically credentialed bloggers of color. She favors bloggers with lots of links and readers.

On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog. But, at conferences, they notice.

About Joanne

Comments

  1. Nina D. says:

    “Cathy Seipp was criticized for organizing a bloggers’ panel that didn’t include left-wing, lesbian, academically credentialed bloggers of color”

    Actually, if you read the story, nobody criticized her for that.
    They criticized her because the panel was right-of-center (according to the participants) and one person pointed out there was nobody of color on the panel. Somebody else noted everyone had blue eyes.

  2. Rosenberg mentions ‘bloggers’, but he names one, who is probably too modest:
    “It was mainly talk radio and a host of
    bloggers, including the widely read education
    writer and former newspaper columnist Joanne
    Jacobs, who ran with the story.”

  3. Is there no place safe from the prying eyes of those bloggers?
    Just kidding.

  4. Walter E. Wallis says:

    What do you mean “Former” columnist?