Off the hook

A Berkeley teacher who moonlighted as a prostitute has retired, temporarily, from both occupations.

Former Berkeley schoolteacher and prostitute Shannon Williams, who said she should not be banned from her daytime profession because of her evening occupation, pleaded no contest Thursday to disturbing the peace and was put on probation.

A prostitution charge against her was dropped as part of a plea agreement. Her lawyer said Williams should legally be able to return to teaching because disturbing the peace is not a crime of “moral turpitude.”

Williams’ prostitution arrest in August as a $250-an-hour hooker gained national talk-show attention, especially after she argued that teachers’ personal lives should not affect their employment.

Wiliams is on leave from her teaching job and says publicity has forced her to take a leave from prostitution as well.

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Comments

  1. I never had a teacher who would have been worth that kind of money; we had one regular substitute who bordered on “crack ho”.

  2. PJ/Maryland says:

    Wiliams is on leave from her teaching job and says publicity has forced her to take a leave from prostitution as well.

    That’s okay, maybe she can prostitute herself as a celebrity now!

  3. Walter E. Wallis says:

    Either show biz or politics. A morning show, kinda “Romper Room Redone.”

  4. Don’t get me started about Romper Room. I still remember Miss Mary Ann from the ’60s, when younger siblings were watching the show. I think I entered puberty a couple years early because of her.

  5. Why are there never ever pictures in stories like these?

  6. dave'swife says:

    $250 an hour and she has a DAY job?
    why?

  7. I wish that the IRS would investigate. I doubt that she reported her whoring income. She should spend hard time in jail.

  8. Interesting that the entire issue of prostitution being illegal was never mentioned. 🙂

    I don’t think it would be appropriate for a teacher to engage in a night job that was against the law.

    In any case, don’t most employers have rules against moonlighting?