Seeds of revolt

From a San Jose Mercury News story on Stanford’s first Fulbright scholar from Mongolia:

A young woman from the steppes of Mongolia was living in Russia in 1988. A friend invited her to a secret screening of an underground movie about a struggle against oppression.

“There were 20 or 30 people in a small basement room,” Oyuna Tsedevdamba recalled recently. “Humankind was fighting these machines, and my first feeling was, ‘It is about us. It is about everybody who is living in this system’.”

She was watching “The Terminator.”

Tsedevdamba, a pro-democracy activist in Mongolia, is studying international policy at Stanford.

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Comments

  1. Is someone going to introduce her to the Governor?

  2. I am amazed how many young people from the Soviet Union in the late 1980s were influenced by that movie. We took in a roomer in LA in the early 90s who was a rather leftist political science doctoral student from Stalingrad. She would NOT stop talking about that movie. “It’s not a movie about fighting,” she’d tell my wife. “It’s about the future.” Took me two trips there to the xUSSR get it.

  3. I’ve actually always thought that the movie (despite the gallons of blood spilled) makes a really strong statement in favor of pro-life. The whole point of the whole darned movie is that one child, still in utero, will change the world some day, if he can be born and grow to manhood. Which is exactly why he needs to be Terminated, right? Which is one of the euphemisms we always hear in place of abortion– terminating a pregnancy…

  4. Richard Brandshaft says:

    We all see our hobbies in the ink blots. Some people’s hobby is forcing women to go thru pregnancies they don’t want.

  5. PJ/Maryland says:

    Even worse, we pay people to prevent some people from terminating their unpleasant neighbors! Why are my tax dollars being wasted on this?

  6. Wasn’t the mother also a target???

  7. a pro-democracy activist in Mongolia,

    Of course, her first mistake is in conflating “democracy” with “self-rule”.

    “There were 20 or 30 people in a small basement room,” Oyuna Tsedevdamba recalled recently. “Humankind was fighting these machines, and my first feeling was, ‘It is about us. It is about everybody who is living in this system’.”

    [RANT]
    “Fulbright scholar”, “studying international policy at Stanford”: so (to continue the movie analogy), her strategy in fighting one terminal of Skynet is to be co-opted by another terminal of Skynet? Does she not realize that these statist-oriented institutions aren’t part of the solution, they’re part of the problem (my guess would be she doesn’t), or is she proposing to “bore from within” and enact political change that way? (Good luck; I fear that any true libertarian impulses she might have will get steamrolled over, smoothly and very thoroughly — these institutions didn’t get where they are by not being willing to use “go along to get along”, with carrots and sticks as appropriate, as a strategy.)

    Hegelian dialectic strikes again: nothing like being able to control your opposition to get the ol’ statist juices flowing.
    [/RANT]

    I’m getting better! 😉