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Those kids better larn their lessons, writes Dave Barry. Because their parents are suffering from brain leakage.

Why do our children perform so poorly on standardized tests? Does the fault lie with our teachers? With our school administrators? With our political leaders? Can we, as concerned parents, sue somebody about this and obtain millions of dollars?

Or maybe it’s time that we parents stopped passing the buck on education. Maybe instead of pointing the finger at everybody else, we should take a hard look at ourselves in the mirror, and place the blame for our children’s lousy test scores where it clearly belongs: on our children. They have a terrible attitude.

I have here a letter, which I am not making up, from a teacher named Robin Walden of Kilgore, Texas, who states:

“I teach math to eighth-grade students. This is an unnecessary task because they are all going to be professional basketball players, professional NASCAR race-car drivers, professional bass fisher people, or marine biologists who will never need to actually use math.”

Like Barry, I went to school in the ’50s and ’60s, when we needed to learn math because some snot named Ivan knew math. A lot of kids were planning to beat up Ivan, if they ever met up with him.

About Joanne

Comments

  1. Ken Summers says:

    “A lot of kids were planning to beat up Ivan, if they ever met up with him.”
    I think they got their wish.

  2. Ken Summers says:

    “A lot of kids were planning to beat up Ivan, if they ever met up with him.”
    I think they got their wish.

  3. Kirk Parker says:

    Sorry, Dave (and Joanne) but the life of a Marine Biologist is not the math-free wonderland you imagine. I even had the honor of teaching programming once to a Marine Biologist once (who worked for NMFS, no less!) She needed to be able to improve some of the analysis and modeling she was doing, and couldn’t find anyone to write the software for her and concluded she needed to be able to do it herself.

  4. Kirk Parker says:

    Sorry, Dave (and Joanne) but the life of a Marine Biologist is not the math-free wonderland you imagine. I even had the honor of teaching programming once to a Marine Biologist once (who worked for NMFS, no less!) She needed to be able to improve some of the analysis and modeling she was doing, and couldn’t find anyone to write the software for her and concluded she needed to be able to do it herself.

  5. Dave Cornutt says:

    Kirk, I’m sure that Dave and Joanne know better. What I think Dave was addressing is the current popular idea among some kids that marine biology is a “soft” field where you get to have dolphins as pets and swim and be out in the sun all day, and essentially have no responsibilities. It’s a bit like the teenage guys who think that getting law degrees will turn them into instant babe-magnets… they don’t know anything about the real profession, they are just in love with the pop image.

  6. Dave Cornutt says:

    Kirk, I’m sure that Dave and Joanne know better. What I think Dave was addressing is the current popular idea among some kids that marine biology is a “soft” field where you get to have dolphins as pets and swim and be out in the sun all day, and essentially have no responsibilities. It’s a bit like the teenage guys who think that getting law degrees will turn them into instant babe-magnets… they don’t know anything about the real profession, they are just in love with the pop image.

  7. What have do become Nascar Driver?

  8. What have do become Nascar Driver?